Colorized Custom Car Photo Posters

 

COLORIZED PHOTO POSTERS

 

NOW finally available from the Custom Car Chronicle. A series of 30 x 20 inch Photo Posters of the famous Colorized Custom Car images.



Created by Rik Hoving from old black and white photos, painstakingly digitally colorized to create an unique look into the wonderful Custom Car Colors of days gone by. These high-res images are printed on heavy, super glossy high quality photo paper, and are perfect to decorate your office, living room, or where ever you want some good looking Custom Car History on your wall.x

 

Each Poster sells for $65.- which includes World-Wide Shipping.

You can also order more than one poster at a discount price. 2 Posters are $110.- (including World-Wide Shipping)
3 Posters are $145.-(including World-Wide Shipping). If you want more than 3, please send Rik Hoving an email to inform about the options.

Each individual poster shown below has a PayPal Buy it Now button. If you want to order 2 or 3 posters, use the buttons for those below and specify which posters you want to order in your Paypal Payment, or send Rik Hoving an email. You will receive an confirmation email from us before the order will be shipped out to confirm the Photos Poster number(s) you have ordered.

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Discount set of 2 Posters
($110.-)

(Please specify which posters (A thru H) you like to have on the Paypal order form.)

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Discount set of 3 Posters
($145.-)

(Please specify which posters (A thru H) you like to have on the Paypal order form.)

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When ordering with the 2 or 3 Poster Button, please make sure to send Rik an email specifying which posters you want. Thank you.

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The Photo Posters will be created and packaged by professionals, and the most care will be taken to get the poster to your door in perfect condition. The Posters will be shipped flat protected by heavy cardboard in the USA. In Europe and the rest of the world the posters will be shipped, rolled up in soft protective paper, inside a square protective box.

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1936 Mercury Concept

 

1936 MERCURY CONCEPT

 

What would have happened if Mercury had started production in 1936 instead of 1939. Imagine 3 inch longer wheelbase 36, with more streamlined top…



This Digital project started when Palle Johansen came across a nice 1936 Ford three window coupe project car. We started to talk about what could be done with the project. Palle wanted it to be a period Custom, but he was also interested in doing something a bit different. We started to discuss the chop of the coupe. And decided that unlike most chops this particular one should start with the actual window opening. Once that was right the rest of the top would need to be shaped accordingly. I had a few very nice side view images of Jon Fisher’s amazing 1936 Ford coupe chopped by Scott Guildner, so it made sense to start with that. The chop on Jon’s 36 Ford is perfect the way it is, but both Palle and me wanted to try something just a little different.

CCC-digital-restyling-36-mercury-base-01This is the photo that I used as a base. Jon Fisher’s 1936 Ford coupe chopped by Scott Guildner.
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However along the way… I started to think some more about what we had talked about, doing something different with the 1936 Ford. On one of my early morning walks with our dog I came up with an interesting though. What if Mercury would have started producing cars in 1936. Then the wheel base of the car would have been 3 inches longer, the nose could be made longer, which always helps the looks on Custom Car. I did a quick Digital Restyling to show Palle, and he loved the idea. At first I worked with the basic shapes of the 1936 Ford, with extended front end including the front fenders. But soon I had added flush fit Lincoln teardrop skirts, which Palle wanted to incorporate, smooth running boards, longer GM headlights and smooth hood sides.

CCC-digital-restyling-36-mercury-01The first version of the Concept 1936 Mercury was rather “simple”. The hood, hood sides and front fenders were extended by 3 inches. I used an 1938 LaSalle grille and the feners where extended down a little at the end for a better flowing line. The chop has been modified with a reshaped side window opening and a few inches extended behind the B-Pillars, to compensate for the longer hood.
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CCC-digital-restyling-36-mercury-02Similar as the number 1, but now with Lincoln fender skirts, side trim and Black Wall tires.
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CCC-digital-restyling-36-mercury-03For version number 3 I added the Nash grille and used 1937 Ford hood side inserts.
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After that I started to think about replacing the door window frames with units shapes similar to an 1939-40 Mercury, and raking the windshield back a little, just as the 39-40 Mercury has compared to the same year Fords. When I added the new door side window frames the coupe belt line did not look right anymore, so I changed it to look more like a 1936 Ford roadster, and convertible combined. At the time I was doing this Digital Restyling I had been very much in love with the Nash grille Kipp Winward was using on his 1936 Ford 5-Window Ford. So I found a picture of that which I could use. The nice rounded shape of the grille extended the nose a little more, which looked really good with the longer wheel base. Next phase was trying out a few different tire and hubcap variations and side trim and hood side options.

 

CCC-digital-restyling-36-mercury-04For version number 4 things really started to look like the concept Mercury I had in mind. A lot of work was needed to make the new door window frames work with the top. The top itself was chopped some more to get in balance with the rest of the body. Auburn hubcaps were added.
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CCC-digital-restyling-36-mercury-05Variation of the hood sides.
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After having done a few variations, I wanted to take the car one step further. I leaned back the windshield a little further, and thinned down the rather heavy 1936 Ford top. I found a nice side view photo of a 1939 Mercury and used a new window frame to create even smoother and more streamlined side window openings. I also reshaped the front fenders to make them a little more bulbous and shaped them a bit more like the rear fenders, or perhas like the 1937-38 Ford fenders look like. But the section where they meet the running boards would still remain very much 36 Ford. I used a modified 1939 Ford Standard side trim on the hood sides.

CCC-digital-restyling-36-mercury-06For the number 6 concept I changed the whole top once again. Leaned back windshield and completely reshaped side window opening. The front fenders have more bulge added at the rear section and a nice u-turn side trim styled after a 1939 Ford was added. I also added 1939 Mercury bumpers to fit the theme a little better.
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Digital-restyling-36-mercury-07aThe last idea I wanted to see for myself was a 5-window body styled with elements of the Matranga 1940 Mercury. I wanted to keep the longer coupe doors instead of the shorter 5-window doors which required an extended and reshaped top, with a smaller trunk opening. Interesting, but perhaps not as elegant as the three window coupe version from number 6.
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Not to long after receiving the project 1936 Ford at his home in Denmark, Palle decided that it would be better to concentrate on the projects he already has going. 1947 Cadillac convertible and the Jack Stewart Ford restoration, so the hard decision to let go of the ’36 Ford Coupe was made. The car is now in Sweden and will be turned into a period Custom Car, but not as the 1936 Concept Mercury as we see in this article. Perhaps at one point Palle will find another 36 Ford, possibly a 5-window coupe, or sedan that could be turned in the 1936 Mercury Coupe Custom…

 

Rik Hoving


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Are you day dreaming about your own perfect dream custom?

  • Do you wonder what your precious car would (or could!) look like, even before you start cutting on it?
  • Would you like to see different paint variations and styled on your custom car before you even start to mask the car, or order that expensive new paint?
  • Or would you like to see the difference of a 2, 3 or 4 inch chop and see the impact it will have on the rest of the car?
  • Maybe you want to see any other modification done to your custom car, without having to actually perform that modification and find out a different modification would have worked better with the rest of your car?

Do you suddenly see all the possibilities? Perhaps now is a good time to contact Rik Hoving and ask him about the possibilities of his digital Restyling options. Request are free of any obligations.

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(this article is sponsored by)

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38 Graham Phaeton

 

DIGITAL RESTYLED GRAHAM

 

I always like to create better looking Custom Cars created from odd body models or styles. The 1938 Graham is such a car, the front end is very attractive, but the rest far from that. Time for a Digital Restyling Session 38 Graham Phaeton.



A couple of decades ago my father bought a 1/34 scale model of a 1938 Graham for his collection. When he showed it to me I was really fascinated by the front end design of the car. Wonderful Art-Deco styling, with its pointy nose, oddly shaped fenders all designed to create instant speed. And beautiful details as the square headlights and taillights sitting high up in the body. One thing I could not really understood was why the main body was kind of ugly, as if it did not belong to the front end of the car.

Many years later I was fascinated by the Graham again when I hear that George Barris had designed a convertible Custom based on this car and that it was being built at that moment. The end result was far from what I had in mind… and back then I started to think about how a really nicely styled Custom based on the 1938 Graham could look like. A year or two ago I heard about the Lincoln coupe project at Steve’s Auto Restoration where they were going to use a 1938 Graham front end combined with the Lincoln body and back. Eric Black did a wonderful side view illustration on that, which was very inspiring. But my vision had always been an early 1940’s styled Graham Custom. About a year ago I was contacted by a client here in the Netherlands who had just bought a 1938 Graham four door project. And he hired me to do a few design proposals to show what would be possible. I did a few very interesting concepts for him, and while I was at it, I decided to created the 1938 Custom Graham that I have had in my mind for a long time. A 1938 Graham Phantom Phaeton. (Well, actually convertible sedan, but that name does not sound as good)


CCC-38-graham-phaeton-brochureThe advertising illustrations make the 1938 Graham look even more spectacular.
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CCC-38-graham-phaeton-4-doorThis was the only perfect side view I was able to find… not good for a starting photo of the Digital Restyling process. However I would be using this photo after I was done with the project for my client to create a four door base for my Ultimate 1938 Four-Door Graham Phantom Custom.
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When I started with the project we had agreed that a side view would be the best way to show the lines of the new car. Well sometimes that is easier said than done. I could not use the actual project car for the Digital Restyling process, A because the car was still on the boat to the Netherlands, and B even if it had been available for photos, the rusty body and missing parts would not have worked as a starting base photo. So I searched the internet for a suitable side view photo. All I was able to find at the time was a un-restored rusty four door, just as my client had (although his project is slightly more rusted) and a nice side view of a rare two door coupe. Since the body styles I needed to create for my client were far from the four door body style, I decided to start with the Coupe. Which meant I had to recreate the four door style for my own project at one point.

CCC-38-graham-phantom-phaeton-00This is the base photo I decided to use. A nice low angle side view that would show the lines of the design the best.
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Both the four door sedan as the two door coupe have kind of ugly rear sections of the body. The coupe has a very elegant top, while the four door body has rather heavy pillars making the car look rather cartoonish. I think it will be very hard to create a really beautiful custom out four door body style without going rather extreme. So for my ultimate Custom 1938 Graham Custom I decided to completely remove the thing I did not like, the top, and rebuilt the car as an four door convertible.

Since I started with the coupe body it was relatively easy for me to do. The A-pillars already had the shape I needed and the B- and C-pillars could also be uses. In real live it would mean quite a bit of custom fabrication to make this change. Possibly another brand wrecked convertible windshield could be adapted. And of course the frame would need to be reinforced. But I know of many four door to sedan convertible projects, so its not impossible to do. And basing this on an wonderfully styled 1938 Graham would create something really unique.

For my ultimate 1938 Graham Phaeton version I added four doors to the two door donor body. The whole body was lowered, the windshield was reshaped to look like a convertible top would look. The side windows were chopped and the B-pillar from the coupe thinned reduced in width by about half the size. I lowered the taillight and moved it a bit further to the rear sitting just behind the side trip. The gas filler cap was shaved and I added running boards as the four door model has, but shaved the top and added some stainless strips to them. This was my base which I would use for a few small variations on the theme.

CCC-38-graham-phantom-phaeton-01My first version was created as an late 1930’s early 1940’s styled phaeton. Dark colored padded top with the rear of the top matching the shape of the rear side window. Single bar flipper hubcaps on early style ribbed white wall tires.
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CCC-38-graham-phantom-phaeton-02aSecond version used a white colored padded top, which changed the looks completely. On this version I used the removed running boards from the coupe, and I added a chrome plated rock shield to the rear fender. I used 1937 Cadillac hubcaps and added 1937 DeSoto bumpers.
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CCC-38-graham-phantom-phaeton-03Third version uses a slightly different shaped padded top, one that flows more in the back, for a more streamlined look. I added 1941 Cadillac hubcaps with beauty rings and updated the white wall tires to a set of smooth white wall tires.
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CCC-38-graham-phantom-phaeton-04The fourth version is done as if it could have been updated in the later part of the 1940’s. Still the same body mods, but the body has been lowered a bit more and set on a more speed boat stance. I have also added a set of Appleton spotlights, Cadillac Sombrero hubcaps, and custom made bumpers. (the bumpers are actually modified pieces from the Eric Black artwork mentioned earlier in this article)
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CCC-38-graham-phantom-phaeton-05The fifth version is a phaeton with a removable hard top, obviously inspired by the Harry Westergard / Dick Bertolucci created Buddy Ohanesian 1940 Mercury.
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There are of course many other ways of Customizing the 1938 Graham, and I have some other really neat ideas in my mind. But for this one I wanted to keep it relatively simple, and most of all something that could have been created in the late 1930’s early/mid 1940’s. I wanted to show that these Grahams are great subjects for Customs Cars with their unique nose and front fenders.

Rik Hoving


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[box_light]

Are you day dreaming about your own perfect dream custom?

  • Do you wonder what your precious car would (or could!) look like, even before you start cutting on it?
  • Would you like to see different paint variations and styled on your custom car before you even start to mask the car, or order that expensive new paint?
  • Or would you like to see the difference of a 2, 3 or 4 inch chop and see the impact it will have on the rest of the car?
  • Maybe you want to see any other modification done to your custom car, without having to actually perform that modification and find out a different modification would have worked better with the rest of your car?

Do you suddenly see all the possibilities? Perhaps now is a good time to contact Rik Hoving and ask him about the possibilities of his digital Restyling options. Request are free of any obligations.

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1983 Metalflake Inspired

 

1983 METALFLAKE INSPIRED

 

Three wild, Metalflake painted cars from Sweden made a HUGE impact on me when I was a young kid, just discovering Custom Cars.

 
[box_light]My mother recently came¬†across a couple of strips of photo-negatives, when she was cleaning out the attic in the house I grew up in.¬†I recognized them as some photos I took from this car show I went to with my dad in 1982-83. I had the photos of these negatives in an album, but also knew that scans made directly from the negatives make much nicer digital photos. So back home I scanned these negatives¬†I had taken¬†as a kid. And they did come out really nice, much nicer¬†than the, apparently poorly developed, photos I have had in my photo album since the early 1980’s. These new scans brought back so many memories… Hopefully I will be able to find the rest of the negatives as well… one day.[/box_light]
 
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It was the first ever indoor Custom Car show I went to. I remember my dad reading out loud from this¬†ad in the newspaper, or perhaps in one of his regular car magazines. “Rik, perhaps this is something you will enjoy“, he¬†then¬†showed me the ad. I could not believe it, a Custom Car show in the Netherlands. I had seen some photos of US and Scandinavian shows in some of the very few European car magazines I had back in 1982-83. And now a car show like this would be¬†here in the Netherlands… and we might go and visit it!… I was ecstatic…. “Can we go, can we go…. please!” My father realized that there could not be a NO for an answer…. So a few weeks later we went to the show. We even took the train, not quite sure why, but I think my dad liked to go by train if we had to go to the west of the country, he did not care much for heavy traffic there. It was the perfect¬†father-son day out.
 

CCC-leiden-show-1983-flyerFlyer for the show in Leiden, The Netherlands.
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When we got there I could not believe my eyes. The parking lot was filled with special cars… No Hot Rods or Custom cars like we talk about here on the CCC, but for the Netherlands they were special, and for me, a young kid from a very small town, I was just in car heaven. We bought the tickets and went inside. I was overwhelmed, there were Hot Rods and Custom Cars all over the place inside the building. You have to realize that this was the time that I started to learn to appreciate Custom Cars. Back then I thought everything that had some special paint or chrome wheels, was already cool. The Hot Rods and Custom Cars inside where not the same style or quality as that most of us are now used to, even from back in the early 1980’s. But all these special cars in one building was so spectacular. I noticed¬†cars from the UK, Germany, Belgium a few from the Netherlands, and quite a few from Scandinavia. Especially the cars from the¬†UK and Scandinavian cars were very¬†spectacular in my eyes.

I was walking around looking at these amazing cars when I made it to the far end of the building. There I saw three of the most Beautiful and stunning Customs I had ever seen in my life. (again, remember this is 1983, perhaps even 1982, and I was a young kid, and was not aware of the American Custom Car history with builders as Barris, Ayala, Valley Custom Shop, Winfield etc). From a distance I spotted the gull-wing-doors of what looked like a Mercury. I knew about the Mercury since I had been looking for an AMT 1/25 scale Mercury for some time. (Later I found out that the car was not a mercury, but based on a 1951 Lincoln four door.) The interior looked totally out of this world, with swivel seats, a cocktail table in the back and everything was upholstered is bright red button-tuffed velvet. I had never, ever seen anything like this before. And then the paint… wild glitter paint… Somebody mentioned that is was Metalflake paint.. I had no idea. I guess I must have stared at the car for quite some time before I was able to take my photo camera and try-pod and start to take photos of the car. Photo’s back then were pretty expensive, so I did not take to many. And I also remembered that the cars where parked close to each other, and those ugly metal fences were blocking the view.
 
CCC-leiden-show-1983-lincoln-01The 1951 Lincoln was based on a four-door-model, the drivers side rear door is welded shut, but the one on the passenger side is still functional, making it a three-door model. The top is chopped and I think the body is sectioned as well. The headlights where remodeled to look more Mercury units.
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CCC-leiden-show-1983-lincoln-03The interior of the Lincoln was something I just could not believe could ever be done in a car. Little did I know that this was a style very popular in the Low-Rider scene in the US. Apparently the builder of the car, Sven Hansson from Sweden, was much better informed about the history and styles back in 1983, than I was. Sweden was always a much more car oriented country than the Netherlands had been.
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CCC-leiden-show-1983-lincoln-02The wild paint turned out to be a Metalflake silver base, the graphics on the side and pin-striping around the headlights and else were, were taped off, and partly covered with candy blue, and fogged in with black. The whole car was covered in many coats of candy red. Back in 1983 it was the most beautiful paint job I had ever seen, and it took me a long time to figure out how it was created. I tried to recreate it on my model cars, but never succeeded.
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I absorbed every detail on this car before going over to the one parked next to it.¬†It was an 1962′ Chevy convertible with a long white weird shaped top, totally different than the soft tops I had seen in the magazines. I had never heard of the word Carson Top back then… But I did like the shape of¬†the top on this car. But what¬†had¬†the most impact on me was the huge boat tail section that was added to the back of the car. My head was spinning and I wanted to build model cars of both of these. And again I noticed the glitter paint… metalflake. It dawned on me that I had seen paint like this before. On the local carnival rides… I had never even thought this would look good on a car. This Chevy had glitter details, as in scallops in white and flames in dark red.

The Chevy was so long it barely fitted the space that was reserved for it in the building. And it was totally impossible to get the whole car in one picture without getting the fence in the picture as well. Another thing I noticed, and which I really liked was the chrome side pipes coming out of the front quarter behind the front wheels. I had no idea it as called a lake pipe… but I knew I liked it. The Chevy was low… and these pipes make it look even lower. Another thing that got my eye was that the steering wheel was made from the same chain material as the grille… This Chevy also had the complete interior done in red velvet.
 
CCC-leiden-show-1983-Chevy-02The Chevy was tall with is boat-shaped rear end. The license plate had to be v-shape bend to fit inside the recess. The mail slot shaped taillights must have looked totally evil when lit at night. The electrical power supply box and Camel tape wrapped fences blocked the car no matter what I tried.
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CCC-leiden-show-1983-Chevy-01I think the Chevy they started with was a sedan model, and they cut off the top and build this padded top for it with a little overhang at the front. This¬†gave the car even more optical length. The chromed chain grille was odd… I even thought so back then, but it was custom, so it must be good. Notice the poor looking¬†display. The cars in the back ground, vans with special paint, VW’s with wide fenders etc show what most of the cars at this Custom Car show looked like, and show how Special these three Metal Flake Customs were.
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CCC-leiden-show-1983-Chevy-03I could not believe how low this car was, especially with the side pipes. Most likely it was hydraulic, but I did not learn about that till long after the show. 
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The car on the other end of the gull-wing Lincoln was a Volvo Amazon. One that had been turned into a two seater coupe with Targa Style top. Again my head was spinning. I saw those Volvo’s driving around where I lived. So I could see that one day in the future I could have something like this… Something Exactly like this one. The car was absolutely perfect in my eyes… back then!!! I found out that the car was owned by a young kid… just a few years older than I was I guess he just had his drivers license.¬†From time to time he would open the one piece front hinged front end of the car to show the wild V-8 engine they had installed. Sadly I never took a picture of that. This was was, just as the other two, painted with wild glitter paint… Metalflake. The builders must have got a huge discount on the paint. Details were done in white and light blue. And the interior on this one was also done in red velvet.
 

Per Webb from Sweden explains about the Volvo Amazon: The reason for a very young Martina in the metalflake Volvo Amazon is that the customized Amazon is not a car, but an EPA Tractor! The Swedish invention with a car with two seats, and a technical maximum speed of 30 km/h. The twin tailpipes behind the cab reveal it as well. The EPA tractors can be driven from 15 years of age. These cars made into tractors was a II World War thing but in the 1960-70’s young guys found out that they could be used for streets instead of field use. Most common back then was Volvo Duett made into tractors and there are still some around. Today Volvo 745 is the most common one to modify, and in the countryside (not Stockholm area…) they are quite popular. More than a few hot rodders / custom builders in Sweden has begun with buildning EPA tractors. Photo google EPA traktor and you will find a lot off odd rides and some nice ones!

 
CCC-leiden-show-1983-Volvo-01The widened fenders, the molded in bumpers, and even the targa-style top was looking so spectacular back in 1983. 
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CCC-leiden-show-1983-Volvo-03The chopped top and widened front gave the car a much more aggressive and sporty look than any of the Volvo Amazon’s I had ever seen before.
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CCC-leiden-show-1983-Volvo-02Before I found out I really liked Special Cars/Custom Cars I was into big trucks, so the back of this Volvo coupe fitted in perfectly. Back then I really loved those pipes thru the rear fenders, those small taillights and the small etched rear window… Notice the hitch below the molded in rear bumper.
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CCC-leiden-show-1983-Volvo-04The molded into one piece front looked really great to me. And for some time I thought that every good looking custom needed to have the bumpers molded in and painted body color… Fortunately my taste in customizing¬†changed quite a bit in the following years.
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CCC-martina-hansson-Volvo-01Recently I came across this photo on-line which shows a young kid inside the Volvo. It appears that the Volvo belonged to Ingemar Hansson or perhaps his siter Martina Hansson. both kids of the builder from the 1951 Lincoln. A car just like daddy…. The owner of the Volve looked very young when I saw the car in Leiden, just a bit older than I was looking back then, and this sure helped imaging me driving in a car like this… back in 1983.
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These three Swedish Custom Cars I saw at this early 1980’s show have had a huge impact on me ever since. And even though my taste in Custom Car has now completely changed. These cars still have a very special place in my heart. I have build many model cars inspired by these cars, and have spend many hours daydreaming about owning a car just like any of these three…

I know that the Chevy is still around in Sweden, redesigned with a different top and new rear end for the body. The 1951 Lincoln with gull-wing doors now lives in the US. I think the builder moved there in the 1990’s and took the car with him. The car has changed hands several times and now has an leather look interior… but the last photos I saw of it it still looked pretty much the same. I have no idea what happened to the Volvo Amazon.
 
 
 
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(this article is made possible by)

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Digital Restyling: 1949 Cadillac

 

DIGITAL RESTYLING: 1949 CADILLAC

 

Being a fan of customized sedan delivery’s, I started to wonder how a 1949 Cadillac would look like as a sedan delivery with the use of Sedanette side windows.



I was searching for a nice photo of a rear view of a 1949 Cadillac to use for taillights on another Digital Restyling project, when I came across this nice front 3/4 photo of a Cadillac Sedanette. I downloaded it from the internet to use at a later date. Not to long after that I was walking our dog and started to day-dream about this 1949 Cadillac, and wondered how it would look with a full sedan delivery body created. But then with theside windows of the Sedanette model left in place. I thought this could create a nice style of side windows in the huge blanked out delivery section of the car.

So back home I went to work on this new Digital Restyling project.
I started with lowering the car to a nice slight speed boat stance. I shaved the emblems and door handles  and chopped the front portion of the top. Then I created the rear portions using other body elements of this caddy. It took a few efforts before I was happy with the back portion of the delivery body. At first I had it too long, with an rather upright rear section. But that did not work. The body became too heavy in the back. It turned out the drip rail was also something that was important in guiding your eyes. Once this base shape was created I made a few variations.  The photo captions give some more details on each version.

CCC-49-Caddy-Sedan-Delivery-00My base photo, found on the internet. (no photographer was listed.)
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CCC-49-Caddy-Sedan-Delivery-01The first version (1) had a chopped top, and sedan delivery body created behind the chopped Sedanette side window design.
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CCC-49-Caddy-Sedan-Delivery-02Next version (2) was a real sedan delivery with complete blanked out sides.
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CCC-49-Caddy-Sedan-Delivery-06(3) Not entirely happy with the overall proportions I decided to section the body just above the beltline. The hood became lower and this created the nice long look I was after. And I wanted to see the Sedanette side windows with the lower body again.
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CCC-49-Caddy-Sedan-Delivery-03(4) Same as above, but now with blanked out sides. I also reshaped the front side window opening to make it look better proportioned and more in style with the delivery body. The versions below are the same, just a few different color samples.
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[box_light]Want to see more? Take a look at some other Digital Restyling projects by Rik Hoving Kustoms on the Custom Car Chronicle site.[/box_light]

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Are you day dreaming about your own perfect dream custom?

  • Do you wonder what your precious car would (or could!) look like, even before you start cutting on it?
  • Would you like to see different paint variations and styled on your custom car before you even start to mask the car, or order that expensive new paint?¬†
  • Or would you like to see the difference of a 2, 3 or 4 inch chop and see the impact it will have on the rest of the car?
  • Maybe you want to see any other modification done to your custom car, without having to actually perform that modification and find out a different modification would have worked better with the rest of your car?

Do you suddenly see all the possibilities? Perhaps now is a good time to contact Rik Hoving and ask him about the possibilities of his digital Restyling options. Request are free of any obligations.






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1950 Buick Digital Restyling

1950 BUICK DIGITAL RESTYLING

In 2011 I created several digital styling studies for Dan Christensen in Denmark. Dan’s plan was to built a classic restyled 1950 Buick with wonderful styling.

Before the digital restyling process begun, Dan and I talked about his dream car. We looking at other cars or elements from cars that he liked. And he listed all the things he wanted, and did not wanted to see in his own dream custom. I would create several views of his Buick with the restyling done digitally to visualize the final car. This way Dan had a visual guidance when it came time to start the building of his car. I starting with a side view to get the most important aspect of this car, the chop as good as possible and to figure out what needed to be done on the real car to recreate this.

The 1950 Buicks are not the easiest cars to get right when chopping. In this case we wanted to create the ultimate chop with the best possible profile. The window trim and stainless would have to be heavily modified or made from scratch for the best effect. Once the chop was finalized and approved on, a few versions with other customizing elements were created.
Once the side view customizing was agreed on, a front 3/4 view was created.This view would show the new grille and headlights treatment.

Sadly some time after the front 3/4 views were done, the project came to an halt. Some time later, Dan decided to sell the project car and move on with other things.
With all the Digital Restyling finished we figured it would be nice to show them here. And perhaps somebody else will get inspired by them.

ccc-dan-50buick-side-01-wThe first photo shows the stock 1950 Buick Dan had bought for the project.

 

ccc-dan-50buick-side-02-wFirst things to do was to get the stance of the car right, removed the emblems and handles etc. Then the chop was handled. At the rear a set of 1951 Cadillac taillights are fitted to the modified rear fenders. The typical Cadillac tail fin was not used which resulted in a much smoother flow.

 

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The final side view

ccc-dan-50buick-side-03-wThe final approved side view. The rear fenders were reshaped more. 1949 Cadillac taillights were used and they flow better with the shape of the trunk than the 1951 models we used in an earlier version.  The rear fender character line was moved up about an inch to meet with the bottom of the taillight. The lower back portion of the rear fender was extended and set at an angle to flow better with the taillights and the rest of the car.

 

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The front 3/4 view of Dan’s Buick that we would use for the Digital Restyling.

 

ccc-dan-50buick-front-02-wThe first step was to get the car lowered as we did on the side view. The unwanted trim was removed and the rear fenders were modified to match the side view (with 1951 Cadillac taillights). Dan wanted to have stock headlight rings for a classic look, but with frenched lights. The Grille teeth were extended and the front bumper was replaced by a reshaped rear bumper from the same year Buick. Resulting in a much cleaner look. I actually liked this front the best.

 

ccc-dan-50buick-front-03-wNext was getting the top chopped in the same way as the side view. On this version the rear bumper used on the front was reshaped at the center with the guards removed for an ultimate smooth look.

 

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The final front 3/4 view

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The final front 3/4 view shows the use of a 1953 Buick grille and the modified rear bumper used below it.



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Rik Hoving Digital Restyling

CUSTOM DESIGN: ARE YOU DAY-DREAMING ABOUT YOUR PERFECT CUSTOM CAR?

  • Do you wonder what your precious car would (or could!) look like, even before you start cutting on it?
  • Would you like to see different paint variations and styled on your custom car before you even start to mask the car, or order that expensive new paint?¬†
  • Or would you like to see the difference of a 2, 3 or 4 inch chop and see the impact it will have on the rest of the car?
  • Maybe you want to see any other modification done to your custom car, without having to actually perform that modification and find out a different modification would have worked better with the rest of your car?

Do you suddenly see all the possibilities? Perhaps now is a good time to contact Rik Hoving and ask him about the possibilities of his digital customizing or custom car consulting options. Request are free of any obligations.

Rik Hoving is an all round custom car enthusiast and designer, who combines his work as a graphic artist and love for custom cars to create well balanced custom car designs. He can create a balanced design in basically any style you prefer. Depending on the wishes of the clients he visualized their dreams using the clients ideas. Or consults them to create the best looks for their car.

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With¬†Digital Custom Restyling¬†you’ll get Photoshopped images of your own car, or a similar car showing one or more options how to best restyle your car.

Custom Car Consulting usually consists of a series of email, phone or skype conversations discussing the options for a certain car. Together we’ll discuss which direction to go and which parts or modification would work best.

A good example is the work Rik has done for the Jack Stewart 1941 Ford. For this project he was hired to research the project, to help identify and locate the missing parts for a full restoration. And to help promote the car the best possible way to get as many people to look at the project.

Do you want to know more? Send an email to contact Rik Hoving

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The Custom Car Photo Archive

OVER ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND PHOTO’S: THE EVER GROWING CUSTOM CAR PHOTO ARCHIVE

The Custom Car Photo Archive has gained quite some attention in the past years. There are stories about custom car enthousiast who started browsing on Friday afternoon and simply couldn’t stop till the next morning.

Yes, its a pretty addictive archive. There are over 100.000 photo’s and we’ve got visitors from all over the world. Some share fantastic stories and fantastic photos with us. Thus helping the Archive to grown bigger and bigger.

VISIT THE PHOTO ARCHIVE->

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WHAT OTHERS SAY ABOUT THE ARCHIVE

Pat Ganahl: Rik is inarguably the wold’s most avid collector and archivist of anything having to do with the history and current status of classic custom cars. You’ve seen his amazing digitally colorized early photos in these pages, and if you have any interest in historic custom cars, you’ve undoubtedly visited his vast online photo archive.
(TRJ #59)

 Jeff Allison: Rik, love the site. I look at it often for inspiration but have never posted a message. I currently own the Astra coupe you have shots of, if you want any more pics or info about it let me know. Thanks again for posting so many sweet photos of stuff that is hard to find.

Dennis Metz – Shelbyville, IN:¬†I am honored that you have posted new photos of my dad’s 1950 Buick. I was visiting the site today to tell my co-worker about other pictures I have seen in an album titled RC Dream Truck and Golden Sahara in the Barris archieves. My father had several customs that are not posted that were in many different Rod and Custom Magazines in the 1950’s. I was happy today to see BOB METZ added as a photo album and much to my surprise I have never seen the photos you have posted of his 1950 Buick. Thanks again.

Pat Ganahl:¬†This naturally led me to Rik Hoving’s website of all things custom, where he had some photos of this car posted, including a couple of the dash/interior I hadn’t seen.
(TRJ #51)

Barry Mazza:¬†I‚Äôam in a state of shock over your collection of photos in the Custom Car Photo Archive. I‚Äôam floored over it and thinks its way over the top. Thanks for the pleasure of seeing these great photos of the cars we love and love to see…………….

Pete Chapouris:¬†Jimmie Vaughan came by today and turned me on to your site. He was right, it’s hard to look at anything else. Great stuff, especially the Ayala cars. I spent many Saturdays there with my dad when I was a pup.

Josh Mills: I am a big fan of your site and reference it often. Thanks for the time you have taken to put all of the info in one place. It is a great collection.

bangshift.com, Posted by Chad Reynolds: If you‚Äôre into custom cars, you may never leave your seat after we show you this. If you‚Äôre not into ‚Äėem, you will be. A guy named Rik Hoving in the Netherlands has compiled The Custom Car Photo Archive that includes incredible images and history of all sorts of customs from the ‚Äô40s through today. You‚Äôll see historic photos, scans of ancient magazine pages, and notes on many cars you‚Äôve heard of and hundreds you haven‚Äôt.

Kurt McCormick:¬†Hi, Rik– My friend wolf told me about your site, and I want you to know what a pleasure it is to look through it. It has obviously taken a lot of time and effort to put it together, and you have done a fine job. I want to thank you for the page on the ‚Äė41 cad. As many pictures as I have of the car, I would rather look at them on your site because they are presented so well. This web site is the definitive custom archive. Thanks for creating it.

Jan Emory Wilson:¬†What an amazing site! I am Neil Emory’s daughter (Valley Custom) and my brother Gary just sent me your website. Thanks so much for all your hard work.

VISIT THE ARCHIVE->

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