2015 Pebble Beach Mercurys

 

2015 PEBBLE BEACH MERCURYS

 

The Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance creates a class of historic 1949-51 Mercury Customs for Sunday, August 16, 2015

 
 
CCC-pebble-beach-concours-logo
Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

Once each year in August about 200 of the most prized collector cars and motorcycles in the world roll onto the fairway of what is often called the best finishing hole in golf ‚ÄĒ the famed eighteenth at Pebble Beach Golf Links. Tire meets turf and transformation occurs: the stage is set for one of the most competitive events in the automotive world. The occasion is the Pebble Beach Concours d‚ÄôElegance.

Originally a small social event paired with a road race through the pine and cypress forests of Pebble Beach, the Pebble Beach Concours has grown into the top-ranking collector car competition in the world. People from all over the globe come to compete in or simply witness and enjoy the Concours here at Pebble Beach.

The Concours is not a contest of speed, but of elegance. Automobiles and motorcycles are judged for their historical accuracy, their technical merit and their style‚ÄĒand the best garner reward and recognition.

The 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance will feature the following following marques and special classes:

‚ÄĘ Ferrari
‚ÄĘ duPont
‚ÄĘ Pope
‚ÄĘ Designs by Carrozzeria Touring
‚ÄĘ Postwar Cunninghams
‚ÄĘ Mercury Customs
‚ÄĘ British Prewar Sports Cars
‚ÄĘ Japanese Motorcycles

 

CCC-ken-gross

 

As in several years before Ken Gross, renowned automotive¬†journalist, has been in charge of the organization of the bi-annual Hot Rod and Custom Car special theme events at the Pebble beach Concours d’Elegance. For 2015 the theme is 1949 – 1951 Mercury Customs.¬†Historic Mercury Customs, built before 1960, that had major magazine coverage, back in the day. In addition to the Historic Mercury Class, they¬†are planning a seminar about Mercury Customs at Pebble Beach for Thursday, August 13th at 3 PM.¬†For this Seminar Ken invited Pat Ganahl, George Barris, Larry Erickson and Rik Hoving to be panelists. Ken Gross will be the moderator at this seminar.

Ken Gross has already invited several Mercury Custom owners to bring their Historic Custom Mercury’s to the event. At this point some of these on the list have been approved while others have not given their final ok. But over all is looking really good and the Mercury Class will be filled with some high quality Historic Custom Mercury’s that will be shown at this prestigious event.

 

Here is the list of confirmed entrants:

  • 1950 Mercury coupe¬†Wally Welch¬†(Justin Mozart)
  • 1949 Mercury coupe¬†Sam Barris¬†(John Mumford)
  • 1951 Mercury ‚ÄúHardtop‚ÄĚ Bob Hirohata¬†(Jim McNiel)
  • 1950 Mercury convertible¬†Ralph Testa¬†(Bill Worden)
  • 1949 Mercury coupe¬†James Dean¬†(National Automotive Collection: Rebel Without a Cause)
  • 1951 Mercury convertible Fred Rowe¬†(Sam Pack)
  • 1950 Mercury coupe Leo Lyons¬†(Geoff Hacker and Rick D’Louhy)

All the historic Mercury’s have to be approved by the Pebble Beach Selection Committee which meets in March.
 
CCC-james-dean-mercury-pb-01The National Automotive Collection¬†is sending the James Dean¬†Rebel Without a Cause 1949 Mercury which will be used as “stock” reference to compare the historic customs to.
[divider]
 
CCC-sam-barris-mercury-pb-01John Mumford will bring the Sam Barris 1949 Mercury.
[divider]
 
CCC-wally-welch-mercury-pb-01Justin Mozart will bring the Wally Welch Ayala/Barris built 1950 Mercury.
[divider]
 
CCC-ralph-testa-mercury-pb-01Bill Worden will bring his Barris Kustoms built Ralph Testa 1950 Mercury convertible.
[divider]

 

CCC-leo-lyons-mercury-pb-01Geoff Hacker and Rick D’Louhy will bring the Leo Lyons 1950 Mercury which is currently being restored in Florida.
[divider]
 
CCC-bob-hirohata-mercury-pb-01The Bob Hirohata Mercury owned by Jim McNiel.
[divider]
 
CCC-fred-rowe-mercury-pb-01The Barris Kustoms built Fred Rowe 1951 Mercury convertible.
[divider]
 
Ken is still¬†looking for some other¬†historic Mercurys¬†and would be really interested in finding out more on the old Louis Bettancourt, Johnny Zupan 1949 Mercury, the¬†Jerry Quesnel 1949 Mercury, or…. If you have any suggestions, or know more about the current whereabouts of these or historic custom Mercury that would fit this event, then please contact us.
 
More info on the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance can be found on the Pebble Beach Concours site.

CCC-leo-lyons-mercury-pb-lawn
 
 

We will keep the Custom Car Chronicle readers updated about this event. And report back when the list of Historic Custom Mercury’s is final, or when other news comes available that is¬†worth to report. This will be a very special event with some of the most historic Custom Mercury’s on the perfect lawns of Pebble Beach with the ocean as back drop.
Last update June 9, 2015

 
 

 

[divider]

 

(advertisement)

CCC-Sponsor-KKB-Ford-02-602

[divider]
 
 
 
.

0

Spotlights when Where Who

SPOTLIGHTS ON CUSTOMS

Spotlights When where who? That has been a subject for¬†many Custom Car Enthusiasts conversations. We know these mostly Appleton Spotlights were near mandatory in the 1940’s and early to mid 1950’s. But where did the¬†use of them¬†come from?

I do not really know the answer to the when, where and who, I wish I did, but at the time the first Spotlights appeared on Custom Cars, it was just something the customizer did. It was not seen as a special event, or something trend setting, nor did they guys back then realize that enthusiast many decades later would still talk about, or do research on. So it just happened, and was never really documented.

My good friend Ulf “Wolf” Christiansson is a die-hard traditional Custom Car guy. He loves the customs from the Golden Era from the 1940’s to the mid 1950’s. And to him no custom is complete without a set of Appleton Spotlights. He has been doing a lot of research about the use of Appleton spotlights, another friend Per Webb also has done a lot of work on researching the subject, and hopefully he will be doing a full magazine article on the history of the Appleton Spotlights in the near future. But for this article I would like to highlight just one small piece of the puzzle. An observation Ulf “Wolf” Christiansson¬†pointed out to me. And perhaps this shows where the early Custom Car guys found their inspiration to start using the Spotlights on their Custom Cars.

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-01An 1937 filed spotlight switch patent shows the already typical shape we are familiar with. But from the samples we show you here we know that the spotlights and handles shaped like these are dated back to at least 1930.
[divider]

We all know the stories that the early Custom builders were inspired by the Coach-build high-end Packards, Cadillac’s, Duesenberg’s, and other exotic car brands. Styling ideas that were transferred to the low-end car brands like Fords and Chevy’s. Low windshield, tear drop shaped fenders and bodies, full hubcaps and a lower stance¬†and smooth body’s with simple chrome elements.¬†Many early custom ideas where most likely inspired by these one-off Classics. Wolf had noticed that these Classics from the early 1930’s sometimes also had accessory Spotlights mounted on the cow, or windshield posts. Even the very¬†popular roadsters had these spotlights mounted on the chrome windshield posts with special brackets. Most of these are mounted with the glass in either the forward or rear ward position, and not like we know from most customs, with the glass facing the hoods. But on a lot of early Custom Car photos from the very early 1940’s we can see this same forward or rear ward position of the Appleton Spotlights being used. It seams that towards the mid 1940’s to spotlights where repositioned with the glass facing down, adn the point of the bucket upwards.

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-03An 1930 Duesenberg with a set of Spotlights mounted on the lower section of the windshield pillar. The glass is pointed to the front of the car. 
[divider]

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-02The handles are on the inside underneath the wrap around section. These handles have round knobs on the end.
[divider]

It looks like the Spotlight trend was first set by the Classic cars of the 1930’s and that the Customizers copied this in the late 1930’s, early 1940’s. The aftermarket companies noticed the demand and made more models available for the Custom Car enthusiast as well as for every day use on regular cars.
Many Custom Cars from the early 1940’s used the spotlights. And the Spotlights were also a popular accessory part for the semi custom cars in those years that where perhaps a bit lowered but other than that only had dress up custom parts like Single bar filler hubcaps, different bumpers and a single or double spotlight.

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-05Another Duesenberg, this time and SJ from 1935 has a set of spotlight mounted on the A-Pillars using a special bracket.
[divider]

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-07This photo from another 1935 SJ shows shows how the bracket looks like. 
[divider]

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-08This is how the handles look like. Interesting is that these handles are chrome plated.
[divider]

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-09Another 1935 Duesenberg SJ shows the Spotlights with the bucket point facing the front of the car.
[divider]

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-10Extremely elegant 1935 Duesenberg SJ Walker LaGrande with a set of A-Pillar mounted Spotlights.
[divider]

One of the great promotors of the spotlights on custom cars was the Barris Kustom Shop. Most of their creations left the shop with a set of Appleton S-112’s or S-552’s mounted on the A-Pillars. When the early Hot Rod and Custom Car magazines showed these cars on the cover and inside in full features the demand for the Appleton Spotlights grew fast. Today a lot of people feel that an custom car styled¬†after this period needs a set of Appleton spotlights to complete the look. Still the Spotlight is also a very controversial Custom Car accessory. Some people absolutely dislike¬†them, and the question often¬†asked is why spend a lot of time to clean up a body from all the handles and chrome trim and then add a huge teardrop shaped ornament on one of the most visual sections of a car, the A-Pillars. However if you look at photos taken in the 1940’s and 1950’s the majority of the Customs used them, and many would look naked without them. Fact is that the famous Appleton spotlights are a highly sought after and demanded part, that only increases in value.

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-11Tommy the Greek’s 1940 Mercury in 1941 shows the use of a set of spotlights with the glass facing to the back.
[divider]

CCC-early-spotlights-classics-12This photo shows a typical semi Custom Car with basically only add ons for customizing. The photo taken in the early 1940’s from the collection of Bart Bartoli shows that the spotlight are mounted with the glass facing the rear.
[divider]

CCC-custom-car-pride-joy-12Another early 1940’s photo shows one, perhaps two spotlights mounted the glass facing forward.
[divider]

So, here it is, another small piece of the Custom Car Spotlight puzzle. Hopefully one day we can add all the pieces together and get the full picture about the history of the Appleton, and other Spotlights used on Customs. When? Where? Who? and why?
 
 
 
[divider]
 

(this article is sponsored by)

CCC-sledge-customs-sponsor-ad03-w
 
[divider]
 

CCC-Sponsor-KKB-Ford-02-602

 
[divider]
 
 
 
CCC-advertisingon-ccc-sponsor-ad
 
 
 
.

0

Jesse Lopez Clone nearly done.

LOPEZ FORD CLONE

The clone of the Jesse Lopez 1941 Ford build by Jerry Daman from Texas is in the final stages. Today Jerry took the car out side for a good look.

CCC-jesse-lopez-ps-01The original Jesse¬†Lopez¬†1941 Ford was build in the ate 1940’s by Sam Barris and Jesse Lopez.¬†
[divider]

Today, Saturday November 22, 2014 Jerry Daman from Texas took his Jesse Lopez clone out of the garage to be able to stand back and enjoy his creation for the first time. Jerry has been working on cloning the Sam Barris and Jesse Lopez¬†created 1941 Ford for Jesse Lopez for quite some time. And in the last couple of weeks he has been putting the car back together.¬†Slowly he saw his month long hard work getting to look like a real car again. There is still a lot left to be done… before Jerry can call it FINISHED. But today certainly is a milestone in creating yet another Vintage Custom Car masterpiece clone.

¬†Enjoy…

CCC-jesse-lopez-clone-getting-there-04

CCC-jesse-lopez-clone-getting-there-01

CCC-jesse-lopez-clone-getting-there-02

Follow the project on the HAMB.

[divider]

 

(advertisement)

CCC-Sponsor-KKB-Ford-02-602

 

[divider]

 

CCC-Sponsor-Kustoms-Illustrated-602

[divider]

CCC-sledge-customs-sponsor-ad03-w

[divider]

.

0

Watsons Dave Robertson 58 Chevy

DAVE ROBERTSON 58 CHEVY

Larry Watson painted many 1958 Chevies in his career, some made it into the magazines, including this Cherry Burgundy Bel Air for Dave Robertson.

 
When Roger O’Dell, on behalf of Larry Watson shared most of the Larry Watson Personal Photo Collection with the Custom Car Chronicle and Custom Car Photo Archive I browsed thru the enormous amount of photos. Many of the cars in those photos were completely new to me. I had never seen them before, since they never made it into the magazine. Not that they were not nice enough to be featured… but I guess if every of Larry’s painted creations would have been featured, the magazines from the 1960-to 80’s should have at least double the pages.

There were also a large number of photos of cars that I did recognize from the magazine’s. One of them I recognized was this wonderful Cherry Burgundy 1958 Chevy Bel Air Larry painted for Dave Robertson from Hollydale, California. The first photo in the collection I saw was the birds-eye view… and I still like that photo the best of them all. The car was parked in front of the Bill DeCarr / Larry Watson 10116 Artesia Boulevard, Bellflower, CA shop, and I guess one of the guys, perhaps Larry himself, climbed on top of the shop and took the snapshot. I recognized Dave’s Chevy from the¬†Restyle your Car¬†Trend Book #205 by Jim Potter from¬†1961.

 
[box_light]This article shows a selection of photos of Dave Robertson’s 1958 Chevy¬†Bel Air Custom, painted by Larry Watson. Most of¬†these¬†photos come from the Larry Watson Personal Photo Collection. More on Larry’s personal collection can be found in the¬†Larry Watson section¬†on the CCC-Site. Or on the¬†Custom Car Photo Archive. Special thanks to Roger O’Dell for scanning this amazing material and sharing them with us on the Custom Car Chronicle.[/box_light]
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-robertson-58-chevy-03Birds eye view of Dave sitting in his Watson Painted 1958 Chevy. What a fantastic photo. 
[divider]
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-roberts-58-chevy-02The car had a full two page spread in the Restyle your Car Trend Book #205 by Jim Potter in 1961.
[divider]
 
Dave’s Chevy was mildly customized with all the right touches. One of the best restyling features done on the ’58 Chevy was to replace the bulbous front section of the side trim, the section that goes on the front fender, and replace it with a section of the rear fender side trim taken from a trim piece of the opposite side of the car. This new shape of the side trim makes the car look much more ellegant and streamlined. And its a relative easy modification.

Of course it was much easier to do back then when you could just go to a Chevy dealer and order a brand new ’58 Chevy side trim. The door handles were shaved, and so was the hood and trunk. Electrical openers were installed. The gas filler cap cover below the trunk was filled in and the gas filler relocated in the trunk. All the extra stainless trim was removed, but the nicely shaped trim around the tip of the rear fender remained… a wise choice since this gives the car the right balance between smoothed paint and crisp bright chrome and stainless.
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-roberts-58-chevy-01Nice photo of Dave sitting in his Chevy in front of the Bill DeCarr / Larry Watson Artesia Blvd shop. Photos like this give us a great look how it was on the streets back then. Notice the fake scoops added to the top of the front fenders.
[divider]
 
On top of both front fenders a nice double peaked fake scoop was added, and two smaller functional scoops were added on both sides of the top. The stock grille was removed to make place for a simple, but very effective chrome tubular insert. At the rear the stock taillights were removed and the body slightly reshaped to make a pair of 1959 Plymouth taillight look right at home.
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-robertson-58-chevy-08A closer look at the nicely shaped fake scoops on the front fenders, the smoothed hood and the tubular grille. 
[divider]
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-robertson-58-chevy-07The black and white photos are from a photo shoot for the magazines in the early 1960’s. Two of them were used in the Restyle Your Car booklet.¬†
[divider]
 
Then it was time for the Larry Watson paintjob. Larry painted the car first with a very brilliant platinum pearl base. On top of that he added many coats of candy Cherry Burgundy until the car had just the perfect color.¬†The dash and steering wheel were painter¬†the same color as the body, and the top section was painted pearl white to match the custom upholstery.¬†The full custom upholstery was done in pearl white tuck & roll vinyl with nice narrow pleats. The suspension was lowered to give the car a perfect slight forward rake, the so called California Rake. A¬†set of chrome reverse wheels was added to the medium size white wall tires, and a set of dummy spots added… and the car was done… and perfect.
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-robertson-58-chevy-06The location was the famous Compton Drive-In theater. It is really sad these photo’s were not taken in color, the Cherry Burgundy must have looked stunning with the pastel green of the wall in the background.
[divider]
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-robertson-58-chevy-05In front of the Artesia Blvd shop with the Hobby shop in the background and Bill’s shop on the right. Behind Dave’s Chevy we can see the Johnny Zupan Ayala/Barris built 1949 Mercury that was being worked on by Bill DeCarr at the time.¬†
[divider]
 
CCC-larry-watson-dave-robertson-58-chevy-04Wonderful low-angle photo shows the 1959 Plymouth taillights and the new double working scoops on the rear of the top.
[divider]
 
 

(advertisement)

Kustom Kar Books Golden Sahara

 
[divider]
 

CCC-Sponsor-KingKustomsTShirt-602Contact Rob Radcliffe at King Kustoms for more info on these T-Shirts Email Rob
 
[divider]
 
CCC-sledge-customs-sponsor-ad03-w
 
[divider]
 
 
.

0

Riley Collins 55 Chevy Cameo

RILEY COLLINS 55 CHEVY

In the later part of the 1950’s Riley Collins Custom Shop in¬†Chico California created some outstanding Custom Cars. Jim Roten designed many of them, including Riley’s personal 1955 Chevy Cameo shop truck.

 
[dropcap]Riley[/dropcap] Collins built this 1955 Chevy Cameo pick up truck for himself. And like a most of his other project cars his good friend Jim Roten was responsible for the the design. Mike Roten, Jim’s son shared one quick sketch Jim made in late 1958 for Riley’s Truck. It showed the use of 1958 Edsel taillights Caddy styled bumper ends and possible plans for full fender skirts. The Skirts and the Caddy bumper ends did not make it to the final version of the truck. But the whole rear fender / taillight treatment Jim designed sure did.
 
CCC-jim-roten-illustrations-09Jim Roten created this, and possibly a few more design sketches for the Riley Collin’s 1955 Chevy Cameo truck.¬†
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-01-jim-rotenThis is the earliest photo we have of Riley’s shop truck. Mostly stock with some of the bright work removed and the headlight treatment started.
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-09-jim-rotenTest fitting the Chrysler headlight in the opened up front fender.
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-02-jim-rotenAn early photo shows the work that was needed to install the 1958 Chrysler Imperial headlights. It also shows that at this point there were no plans for the Oldmobile grille surround/bumper set up yet, hence the metal work below the headlights.
[divider]
 
Riley started the truck with dropping the car 3 inches front using a dropped axle and the same amount at rear using a different set up for the springs, to get the perfect ride height. Jim had designed the car with a set of lake pipes, so Riley knew those would optical drop the car even further. All the stainless trim and door handles were shaved and the holes filled and smoothed for an nice smooth look. The doors are now operated using an electrical push button system.The front fenders were reshaped to accept a set of quad headlights taken from a 1958 Chrysler Imperial. The hood corners were rounded and now flow nicely into the shape of the Chevy headlights.
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-06-jim-rotenThe early version finished in primer. The hood corners had not been rounded at this time.
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-03-jim-rotenBirds eye point of view shows the front end restyling on the truck. Spotlights have now also been added.
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-05-jim-rotenNotice how smooth the transition fro the Olds grille surround to the body is. I particular like the shape just underneath the hood and how it flows into the grille surround and headlights. This is very well designed and very well grafted restyling. Kudos to the Riley Collins and Jim Roten team.
[divider]
 
The whole grille unit was removed and an 1956 Olds front bumper/grille surround was installed. Riley hand made the body surround around this unit from round rod and sheet metal. The new front end changed the looks of the truck completely and gave it a very elegant appearance.

Another typical Jim Rotan design feature is the hand made grille. We have seen several of those in other Jim Rotan design sketches. (take a look at the¬†CCC-Article¬†on some of Jim Roten’s Custom Car designs sketches) Most of the grille was made from round rod, bend to shaped and welded into a single unit. Combined with two 1955 Buick bumper bullets¬†¬†before it was smoothed and send out to be plated. The new grille was place on to of a sheet of perforated chrome plated metal.
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-07-jim-rotenRiley Collins standing with his 1955 Chevy Cameo.
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-truck-08-jim-rotenSome fine tuning was done on the body work and Riley had the grille roughed in, still in need of smoothing and plating. The perforated metal sheet back section is still missing when Jim took this photo at Riley Collins Body shop.
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-55-chevy-truck-01The finished truck at the Sacramento Autorama show, just after the car was finished in pearl white, and Jim Roten had taped the scallops with 1/4 inch tape and Riley Collins painted them withe 3-part candy red lacquer. (photo courtesy of Kent Collins)
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-55-chevy-truck-02Great side view in front of the California National Guard building shows the nice flow of the candy red scallops. (photo courtesy of Kent Collins)
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-55-chevy-truck-03A good look at the front of the truck with the hand made grille and very nicely done scallops which enhance the body styling Wheels are reversed chrome units with color detailed hubcaps added. (photo courtesy of Kent Collins)
[divider]
 
At the back Riley set out to duplicate Jim’s sketch as close as possible. He extended the fenders at the top with a hooded section. He later would fill this section with a very fine wire mesh insert. Below that he reshaped the rear fender and the tailgate to accept 1958 Edsel taillights flipped from side to side so that the downward section is now at the sides of the car and not towards the middle¬†as they are on the stock Edsel’s. The whole tailgate unit was completely reshaped and the shape of the rear quarter panels was extended onto the tailgate, and followed the shape of the Edsel taillights. The stock 1955 Chevy rear bumper-ettes were modified with round exhaust tips at the bottom. The non chrome center section was reshaped with a round rod license plate cover in the middle.
 
CCC-riley-collins-55-chevy-truck-04A lot of work went into the back of the truck as well where the flipped 1958 Edsel taillights are the center piece. Notice the roof insert in contrasting red. (photo courtesy of Kent Collins)
[divider]
 
CCC-riley-collins-55-chevy-truck-05Rer 3/4 view of Riley Collins 1955 Chevy Cameo. Not shown in these photos is the special made tonneau cover. (photo courtesy of Kent Collins)
[divider]
 
With all the body work completed Riley primered the body work and drove it around for a bit before he would paint it “mother of pearl” white with candy red accents. The interior was done in white naugahide with red inserts. Jim Roten mentioned that the engine compartment looked as good as the exterior. It had a 265 Chevy small block equipped with a Duntov cam, solid lifters, multiple carburetion, Corvette valve covers, headers, and glasspack mufflers. And it sounded as good as it looked. Even the front fender liners were chromed plated. Basically a ’56 Corvette engine in a truck! In those days few customs had hot engines, but this one did.

Riley sold his truck in the late 1960’s or early 1970’s. And we have no idea what happened to it after that. Does anybody have a clue where this one is today? Or what happened to it?

CCC-riley-collins-55-chevy-truck-06An other paint job shows a different design for the scallops and all white around the grille surround. (photo courtesy of the Barris Collection)
[divider]

CCC-riley-collins-55-chevy-truck-07

CCC-jim-roten-illustrations-19This version of the Riley Collins Shop Truck was featured in the Custom Show-Cars Trend book 181 from 1959.
[divider]

 
Special thanks to Jim and Mike Roten and Kent Collins for sharing the photos for this article.
 
 
 

[divider]

 

(advertisement)

CCC-Sponsor-Kustoms-Illustrated-602

 
[divider]
 

Kustom Kar Books Golden Sahara

 
[divider]
 
CCC-sledge-customs-sponsor-ad03-w
 
[divider]
 
 
.

0

Gil Ayala T-Bird restoration start

AYALA T-BIRD RESTORATION

In October 2014 we reported that the old Gil Ayala 1955 T-Bird was sold, and going to be restored. In November 2014 we can report that the restoration at Yaril’s Customs has begun.

 
Yaril’s Customs in Miami, Florida is the shop the new owner picked to have the old Gil Ayala T-Bird Custom restored. The car arrived from california at the end of October 2014, an soon after that Owner¬†and¬†fabricator at the shop, Yaril Quintana¬†started working on the car. Yaril started with dismantling the car, removing all the parts that could be removed and then slowly starting to strip the body from the primer and other old layers of paint still on the car.

From the outside it was already evident that there were some rust issues and other age problems that need to be addressed. But once the whole car has been stripped it can really be seen how much work will be needed to get the car back in its show condition from the late 1950’s.
 
CCC-gil-ayala-yaril-resto-starts-01Arrival of Gil’s old 1955 T-Bird at Yaril’s Customs Shop in Miami Florida.
[divider]
 
CCC-gil-ayala-yaril-resto-starts-02A few photos showing some of the work that needs to be done. Rust repair, dents, old filler, and many coats of paint.
[divider]
 
CCC-gil-ayala-yaril-resto-starts-03A good look at the custom panel Gil created at the back. The whole rear portion was removed and replaced with this custom rolled panel with set in license plate.
[divider]
 
CCC-gil-ayala-yaril-resto-starts-04A great look at how the Ayala’s extended the rear fenders to add the Lincoln taillights. The original rear fender end is still in place.
[divider]
 
CCC-gil-ayala-yaril-resto-starts-05The original version of the Wild Bird had a functional hood scoop and louvres. The later version had the scoop and louvres removed for a much smoother look.
[divider]
 
CCC-gil-ayala-yaril-resto-starts-06Lots of body work for the new front end to include the Pontiac split bumpers.
[divider]
 
CCC-gil-ayala-yaril-resto-starts-07Back side of one of the Pontiac front bumpers show the custom made brackets.
[divider]
 
The new owner is still looking for more info, and especially more photos of this Ayala custom from the late 1950’s, or early 1960’s. The more info he has the more accurate the restoration can be done. If you know more about this car, because you saw it back in its heydays, have any old photos of the car, or perhaps know somebody who might know more. Please contact us here at the Custom Car Chronicle, or contact Yaril at Yaril’s Customs. A link to his site can be found at the end of this article.

The new owner is also looking for a donor 55 T-bird, to add the missing parts as, seats, motor, glass and a lot of misc parts.
 

More photos in the CCC-Forum-Post 

[box_light]Yaril has started a new CCC-Forum-POST where he will keep us posted on the restoration progress of the Gil Ayala 1955 T-Bird. So be sure the check back frequently to make sure you will not miss any thing on yet another exciting old Custom Car restoration. There are already a lot more photos to be seen there right now.[/box_light]

CCC-yarils-custom-logo-ford

 

[divider]

 

(advertisement)

CCC-Sponsor-Kustoms-Illustrated-602[divider]

 

Kustom Kar Books Golden Sahara

 
[divider]
 
CCC-sledge-customs-sponsor-ad03-w
 
[divider]
 
 
.

0

Snooky Janich Paint Update

SNOOKY JANICH PAINT

After years of on and off working on the restoration of the Barris-built Snooky Janich 1941 Ford, the “end” is finally getting closer. The body finally has color on it.

 
Owner George Mallory has entrusted Dan Roberts and team at the Express Paint & Detail shop in Leavenworth with the job of fine tuning the body and getting it in paint. Well that last part, getting it in paint is finally there. Dan Roberts and David Daniels are currently in the progress of adding the paint. In the next two or so days the whole body will be in finished glossy 1952 Cadillac green. Today, November 13, 2014 Dan painted the car with two coats of base, which will be followed with two more base coats tomorrow. Then on to a couple coats o clear in the weekend.

The color already is looking amazing, but according to Dan it will become even a bit darker since the green is not covering 100%, so the next two more coats of base will darken the final color a little more.
 
I have started a CCC-Forum post where updates on the restoration process are being posted. So if you want to stay in touch check out the CCC-Forum for the lasest updates on the Snooky Janich Restoration.
 
CCC-barris-snooky-janich-paint-01Doors jambs and inside sections are all painted, the doors hung for the final time and the car is now ready to be taped of completely.
[divider]
 
CCC-barris-snooky-janich-paint-02Exiting moment for the team… the body is all taped up and ready for chrome premier and then on for some color.
[divider]
 
CCC-barris-snooky-janich-paint-03This is how the body looks after two coats of base color.
[divider]
 
CCC-barris-snooky-janich-paint-04

 

 

 

The next day it was time for two more green base coats, and then a few coats of clear. More photos of the glossy new paint-job can be seen in the CCC-Forum Post, linked above.

 

CCC-Snooky-Janich-Ford-GPaint-02

 

CCC-Snooky-Janich-Ford-GPaint-07

 

 

[box_light]

Dan Roberts
Express Paint & Detail
, in Leavenworth Kansas, 66048.
Phone 913-240-1418
Facebook Dan Roberts

CCC-Snooky-Janich-Ford-Resto-logo

[/box_light]

 

[divider]

(advertisement)

CCC-Sponsor-KKB-Ford-02-602

[divider]
 
 
 
.

0

Memo Ortega Stories Part Sixteen

PART 16

Back to the 1970’s and into the 1980’s, Memo flashbacks to when he met his future wife, paints a T-Bucket and Customizes his friends 1977 Chevy Step-Side.

 
[box_light]Memo Ortega is a well known name in the SoCal Custom Car and LowRider Scene, but perhaps not as well known as it should be. Memo has been working on custom cars and Low Riders since the early 1950’s. He became good friends with Custom Car Icon Gil Ayala, and in the late 1950’s he even bought Gil’s famous 1942-46 Ford Coupe as a persona driver. Today, in 2014, 80 years young, Memo is still chopping tops, and any other custom car work you can think of from, his garage work-shop. Check out more of the¬†Memo Ortega Stories¬†in the¬†Memo Ortega Files¬†on the CCC[/box_light]

 

By Memo Ortega
 

Rainbow Gardens Flashback

I came across¬†an online photo where they are having some dinner at the Rainbow Gardens, Thats where me and the guys were cruzin on a Sat nite, and meet Terry’s friends cruzin in their¬†’57¬†Chevy hardtop.¬†We followed them to Montclair where we met Terry at her house. We were in my custom painted Olds¬†that day. Owner of the ’57¬†Chevy¬†was Carmen, the girl sitting on my Olds front fender in one of the photos in Part TEN¬†of my stories.) The girls were always cruzin with her. Anyway, one of the girls was Terry’s sister. ¬†When we got to there house in Montclair, we stopped in front and Terry came out, we introduced ourselves, and to the other gals. We got to talking, and having a lot of fun. Terry told us, you guys better leave before my dad comes home, or we might get in trouble, its already after ten.

Right when she tells us this,¬†here comes a car up to the house, it was their¬†dad!¬†She told us pleace don’t take off right now, then he is¬†gonna think the worst of you guys and us.¬†¬†So we started sweating balls, oh shit we got them in trouble now… and so are we. he drove in the driveway, and came out of his car, a ’51 chevy hardtop with a continetal tire on the back. He headed toward us, let me tell you, he was a big heavy cowboy wearing a big cowboy hat!¬†First thing he tells us why dont you guys come in, an talk to the girls inside.¬†Terry tells us… “yes you guys better come in”.¬†Well this¬†all turned out real good. Thats how I¬†met Terry, to which I’m still married today.
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-06I saw this picture on the net, with this diner party at the Rainbow Gardens, and had to think about the day I met my future wife Terry.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-22Inside of the Rainbow Gardens before the crowds got in. It was a magical place for us back then. (Courtesy of Pomona Public Library http://content.cdlib.org)
[divider]
 

The Rainbow Gardens in the ’50’s and 60’s in Pomona, Ca was a very popular place for everyone that wanted to go have a good time dancing on Saturday nites. The place had always some popular bands or orchestras performing there, and they always drew big crowds. Singers like¬†Perez Prado, who¬†had some bad songs on the radio charts at the time.¬†Me and the guys always cruzed by there checking out the wandas. Then there was El Monte Legion Stadium, another of my favorite¬†popular place to go for Rock &¬†Roll music. I¬†mean popular in El Monte Ca, with Art Laboe heading the shows with such greats as; Don and Dewey, Robert and Johnny,¬†Ritchie Valens, Johnny and Joe to name just a few. To me those were the places to go. The famous Art Laboe is still on the radio with his oldies but goodies music after all these years how cool is that!. Great¬†Flashback¬†memories from back then.

 

CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-23
El Monte Legion Stadium with Art Laboe and¬†Jerry Lee Lewis, outside of the building, announcement poster and one of Art Laboe’s records.
[divider]

 
 
1937 Chevy fender art
When Memo send me some photos of a trike he was working on in October 2014, I spotted something green and round in the background. It looked like a fender sitting next to the garage. So I asked Memo what it was… “Oh that!¬†thats my old passenger front fender of my ’37 Chevy from when it was green with seaweed flames.¬†I took the¬†fender off since it was rough, and had some minor damage. I had found a better one and since I was going to repaint it, I used the better one. I put the old one next to the garage and it has been there ever since.¬†
Some guys even have tried to buy it from me, but I¬†never sold it. I just¬†like it where it is.”
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-01The 1937 Chevy front fender in 2014, retired next to the garage.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-part-twelve-11-wAnd this is how it used to look.
[divider]
 
 

¬†Carl Cole’s T-Bucket

In part 15 of the Memo Ortega Stories we followed Memo’s GMC pick up all the way until he sold the car in the 1990’s, but there is a lot more to tell from the 1970’s and early 1980’s. So lets get back in time and let Memo tell some more great memories.

A little latter on the ’70’s the T¬†buckets got to be the rage. I met a guy named¬†Carl Cole he was a hard core drag racing fan. He came over and asked me if II¬†would cherry out his T-Bucket and give it custom paint job. He had¬†found out about me from Mike Evans that I did a lot of paint jobs.¬†I¬†said, yes sure I will paint¬† your T-Bucket , and make something real nice for you. He dropped his T-Bucket¬†body off an¬†I¬†cherried the body, primmed it, and gave it a nice custom paint job.¬†When I¬†was done, I¬†took it over to his house we laid the body on his lawn, he came out to take a close look. He was so happy the way I painted the body. Some time later he finished the car and whosed me how it came together. The T came out really nice and the paint did look really great on it.
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-02
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-03Carl Cole’s finished T-Bucket looked touch with the Daisy wheels and white coated exhaust. Typical Hot Rod for the time, it came out real nice, and Carl was happy.
[divider]
 
Well all these¬†years have gone by, and¬†I¬†recently¬†saw the T again. Carls gave me a call to come over to his house and there is was, right there in his garage.¬†Some sections still have my old paint job on it.¬†Carl is redoing the car againg and it is gonna be awesome when its done. Carl asked me if I was interested in doing the new paint on it… I told him to give me some time to think about it… we will see.¬†Latter on when its finished¬†I¬†will hope¬†I¬†can get some photos for¬†the CCC.
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-04The day I saw Carl and his old T-Bucket again in his garage. The car had been updated a lot over the years. and was used to race. But Carl plans to bring it back to how it used to look.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-05Thats me and Carl checking out the T-Bucket body. the fiberglas still looked good after all these years. I was happy to see some of the old paint was still there.
[divider]
 
 

Richard Mendez ’77 Chevy

 
In the last episode on my stories I mentioned than while I was working on my GMC Truck, Richard Mendez asked me to do his ’77 Chevy Step-Side. I actually did his car before I continued working on my GMC, so lets get on to Richards Truck.
Richard Mendez came by with his ’77¬†Chevy Stepside, he wanted me to chop the top at first, but said he had more ideas for it that would come later. So we went over what he wanted done on his Stepside besides the chop. Custom tail-gate, shaved, and custom headlights.¬†But I had to start with the chop. He left the truck and I¬†started working on the top. It took me a while to get it right, I had to split the top to get the pillars to line up. ¬†When I¬†was done with the top , we took it over to Bobs in Ontario Ca for the glass work. They did a great job on cutting the glass to fit the smaller window opening.
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-07Making the first cuts on Robert’s truck, here you can see how much the pillars angle and what it will take to get them to line up later.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-12A few of the in progress photos show me cutting the doors, the top in halves, working on the roll pan and the car after it got back from the glass guys.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-18Love this picture of Richard…¬†No turning back now. See the lemon on the hood, I love eating lemons fresh from our lemon tree. I ate them all the time, with or without salt. The one on the hood did not last long after the photo was taken.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-11Tried my shot at taking some fancy Art photos. It also shows the extra length I had to add to the top of the doors to get them line up again.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-13Some of the hard work just needs to be captured in a photo. Here I cut the top in half to make sure I could line up the pillars. My 37 in the background.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-17After the top was done, Richard took the car to the glass guy, who did a great job. He then took it back to me for more work. Here Richard starts sanding the body and soon I would be changing the headlights.
[divider]
 
A little while after the glass work was done Richard¬†brought the car¬†back to me, for more custom work. I was impressed with the way the truck looked with all the glass work done. Next I¬†shaved the door handles and emblems off. I then moved on to the back of the bed where I¬†installed a louverd rear panel on the tailgate. I also rolled a panel bellow the tailgate to give it a cool look on the back. In the center of the new rolled pan I created a recessed section for a sunken license plate. Up in front we had the hood louvered and ¬†I¬†installed a ’59¬†Chevy¬†Impala rear bumper with its lower panals an small bumper guards, richard brougth me a set of¬†61¬†Chrysler¬†quad headlites for the front. He wanted the quad lites slitly canted and upside down.¬†So I filled in the holes from the stock headlights and¬†I¬†did the¬†headlights just¬†the way he wanted them.¬†He was real happy with his truck.¬†Latter on¬†Richard¬†painted the truck a dark blue metallic. Richard is a true die hard street cruzer in my book.

CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-08Richard wanted to use 1961 Chrysler headlights, so I took out the stock units, shaped a filler panel, and figured out the angle of the lights Richard liked best. By now we had the hood louvered and in primer.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-09The front bumper has been replace with a 1959 Chevy rear bumper by now and I’m working on the installations of the 1961 Chrysler headlights.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-15At the back I installed a roll pan to which I added a recessed panel for the license plate.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-16This is how it left me, chop was all done with glass installed, shaved doors, louvered hood, bumper change and ’61 headlights. Then Richard took over from there. That is Dukie in front of the truck. One smart dog that was with us for 16.yrs
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-19Richard added the 1970 Mustang taillights into the smoothed rear fenders.He painted the car ins a great looking metallic blue. It came out really nice.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-20
 
CCC-memo-ortega-stories-16-21The finished truck, Richard was a very happy man, he loved his “Evil Ways” 1977 Chevy Step-Side Truck.
[divider]
 
CCC-memo-0rtega-part-eleven-end-w

Go to part Seventeen.
Go to part 15.

[divider]

 

(advertisement)

CCC-Sponsor-Kustoms-Illustrated-602

 
[divider]
 
CCC-sledge-customs-sponsor-ad03-w
 
[divider]
 

Kustom Kar Books Golden Sahara

 
[divider]
 
 
 
.

0

Dick Colarossi 1940 Ford

 

DICK COLAROSSI 1940 FORD

 

In the early 1950’s the Valley Custom Shop restyled this 1940 Ford for Dick Colarossi. He last saw it in 1966 in the San Fernando Valley, who knows what happened to it?



A little while ago the Custom Car Chronicle was contacted by¬†Vicky Carabini, with the question if we could spread the word that her father,¬†Dick Colarossi, was looking for a Valley Custom Shop created 1940 Ford he had in the early/mid 1950’s. The 1940 Ford was started by Dick, who handled most of the mechanical work, but when it came time for the body restyling he took the car to the Valley Custom Shop. The car was featured twice in Rod & Custom Magazine, once in an how-to article on how to build Nerf-Bar bumpers, and one feature article, both articles had¬†4 full pages.

Dick sold his¬†coupe in 1957¬†to a¬†new owner. All Dick remembers about him was that he was a pilot for United Airlines, sadly he could not recall his name. After that Dick spotted his old coupe one more time. This was in 1966 when he saw the car race at a drag strip in San Fernando Valley. The original flathead engine had been replaced with a hot Pontiac engine. This was the last time Dick saw his car. He has been searching for his Ford for several years, with no luck so far. So with the help of his daughter Vicky he is not spreading the word on the internet, in the hope somebody will recognize his old car, and he will be able to find out where it is today, or what happened to¬†the “Monk-Wagon“, as Dick nick-named his 1940 Ford. There are a couple of very¬†distinctive¬†features on this car, that hopefully somebody will recognize.
Please contact us¬†if you have any info on this 1940 Ford’s whereabouts, or know what happened to it after 1966.

Many thanks to Vicky Carabini, Dick Colarossi’s daughter for sharing the family photo’s of the “Monk-Wagon”, and Kustoms Illustrated editor Luke Karosi for scanning these photos.


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-01Vicky Carabini shared the 12 photos here father Dick Colarossi still has of his old 1940 Ford. Above are 6 of the mostly badly faded photos. We tried to do all we could to restore them as good as possible. But most of the photos have been faded to a dark yellow, leaving nearly no color at all. However a few of them, mostly the interior photos contained a bit more color.
[divider]



The Monk Wagon, 1940 Ford

Dick Colarossi from Glendale, California, started working on his 1940 Ford in 1950, he had just turned 17, and was learning to do mechanical work while practicing on his own Ford. He knew what he wanted for this 1940 Ford, and also knew he could do some of the work, the mechanical stuff, himself, but would have to rely on somebody else for doing the cosmetic part. it would take him nearly 5 years before the car would be finished as we can see it in the 1955 Rod & Custom Magazine feature.

The car was lowered in the front using a 2.5 inch dropped axle, and the rear of the frame was stepped a full 5 inches. This resulted in a wonderful slight speed boat stance. The engine was replaced with a 59A block which was fully detailed and hopped up with three Stromber 48’s and an Edelbrock manifold. Dick created a special exhaust system that would exit thru the inner fenders and run underneath the running boards and exit at the end of the running boards with nice oval shaped chrome plated tips. The firewall was cleaned up as were the inner fenders. The whole engine bay was exceptional clean. Dick also filled the gas filler on the rear fender and relocated it inside the trunk.


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-02The Rod & Custom feature mentioned that the headlights were protected by chrome mesh screens over the bulbs. Since it does not show on any of the photos I asume this was installed behind the glass. Photo developed in the week of July 26, 1954. (Courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-09Dick took a photo of his wife Justina sitting in the Coupe in its early unfinished stage. We can see how much the stock rear fender covers the white wall tires in this first version. Photo developed in the week of July 26, 1954. (courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]


Next Dick took his coupe to the¬†Valley Custom Shop¬†who would do their magic on the car. The hood was shaved, welded into one solid piece and peaked at the front. The door handles removed and electrical openers installed with micro buttons hidden in the side trim. The trunk was completely shaved and a new inboard lucking system installed that could be activated from the dash. Speaking about the dash, that is another thing that the Valley Custom Shop modified this first round. The stock gauge cluster of the 1940 Ford dash was filled and a much larger tunneled panel was created to house 6 round¬†Stewart Warner¬†gauges.¬†The center section was also smoothed and fitted with a chrome 1954 Ford radio face. All the dash knobs were relocated in a section below the main dash panel for an ultra clean look. All window garnish moldings were polished smooth and send out to be chrome plated. The interior was updated with a full width rear bench and then uphostered in maroon and¬†eggshell Naugahyde by¬†Floyd Tipton’s Upholstery shop¬†from Burbanks. Floyd Tipton handled¬†a lot¬†of the Valley Custom Shop created Custom interior.


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-07Floyd Tipton did the eggshell and maroon upholstery in Dick’s 1940 Ford. The Valley Custom Shop restyled dash was painted gloss black. Photo developed in the week of July 26, 1954.¬†(Courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-04Wonderful detailed engine bay was the work of Dick himself. Photo developed in the week of July 26, 1954. (Courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]



CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-15Rod & Custom Magazine used progress photos taken at the Valley Custom Shop during the production of the Nerf Bars for Dick’s coupe in their March 1955 article on how to “Nerfing Bars”. The article shows the whole process, step by step with clear photos and¬†explaining text to show the readers how to do this at home.
[divider]


Valley Custom Shop reshaped the back of the car, where they shortened and rounded the bottom of the¬†tail panel below the trunk as well as the lower edges of the rear fenders behind the wheel openings. Taillights were replaced with the popular torpedo shaped 1941 Studebaker units. The Valley Custom Shop¬†was also responsible for the nicely shaped Nerf-Bar bumpers on Dick’s car. And how to article in the March 1955 issue of¬†Rod & Custom¬†magazine showed the readers how they were created, and setting a new trend. The louvered side grilles of the 1940 Ford were send out to be chrome plated giving the front a much wider look.¬†The car was painted a wonderful deep Oxford Maroon by the Valley Custom Shop. This first version of the car also included a set of fender skirts, although some of the photos Dick took in 1954 show the car with out the hood and fender skirts. But that was just because he was still working on detailing the car during that period.


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-10According the back of this Kodacolor print it was developed in the week of Dec 6, 1954.  It shows the reshaped panel below the trunk, the simple but very elegant Nerf-Bars, the 1941 Studebaker taillights and the fender skirts.(Courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-03This much faded photo gives us a better look at the reshaped rear panel and lower rear edge of the rear fender and how nice everything works together. Photo developed in the week of Dec 6, 1954. (Courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]


Dick won first price award in his class at the¬†1954¬†International Motor Revue. The car was displayed with fender skirts and aftermarket single rib moon hubcaps,¬†the way Dick loved it during this time. But shortly after the show he decided he wanted a bit more sporty look for the car. The fender skirts had to go, and since he did not care much for the fender over hang on the wide white wall tires, he took the car back to the Valley Custom Shop to have them raise and reshaped the wheel openings. The new reshaped openings with reshaped and enlarged corners gave the car a completely different look. From a “heavy” tail-dragging look in 1954 it now had become a sleek streamlined sporty looking car what looked like it was going a 100 miles just standing still. This was the real look Dick had been after when he started his 1940 Ford in 1950.
In the September 1955 Rod & Custom magazine feature we can see that Dick still used the typical Valley Custom Shop aftermarket single rib hubcaps on the wide white wall tires. But later Dick would remove them to give the car en bit more aggressive look.


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-08Dick proudly showing the award he won at the 1954 International Motor Revue. Dick’s 1940 Ford took¬†1st place in its class. This is one of the few photos of the car showing the fender skirts in place. Later Dick removed them, for a more sporty look. Photo developed in the week of Dec 6, 1954.¬†(Courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-06The R&C feature article showed the car with a stock 1940 Ford steering wheel, but his January 17, 1955 shows the steering wheel had been replace by an 1951 Lincoln unit, after the R&C feature photos were taken. (Courtesy of Vicky Carabini)
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-05Enlarged section of the interior photo gives us a good look at the modified 1940 Ford dash. The Valley Custom Shop did the restyling work. The window cranks were replaced with Chrysler units for a more exclusive look.
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-13Ina Mae Overman took this great picture of Dick’s Coupe in either late 1954, or early 1955. This photo shows the great style Dick had created for his car. Elegant and sporty. (thanks to Mary Ellen Marcy for scanning this photo)
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-12Color slide taken by¬†¬†Tad Hirai which was¬†shared by¬†the¬†Valley Custom Shop Facebook page.¬†On the left we can see¬†Dick’s Ford, in the middle is¬†Tad Hirai’s 1950 Ford and Glen Hooker’s 1939 Merc convertible sitting in the shadow on the right.
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-11Enlarged section of the Tad Hirai¬†photo shows how low Dick’a mercury was. The nerf bar bumpers, the white walls and black wheels on this version made up for an interesting Custom/Hot Rod/Race Car look.¬†
[divider]


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-16The September issue of Rod &¬†Custom showed the finished version of Dick’s Ford including the radiused wheel openings. The interior photo shows the stock 1940 Ford steering wheel.
[divider]


In 1955, when the Rod & Custom Magazine article Monk’s Machine appeared, dick was serving in the Army. The article mentioned that Dick still had the car at the time and that he had future plans for it for after he would leave the US Army. The article did not mention that these plan were, but most likely Dick had been inspired by other cars and wanted to update his own version to make it even more perfect. But it never came to that. Dick sold the car in 1957, just as you can see it in this CCC-Article.

One June 2nd, 2017 we received a picture and some info that 46to64 had shared on his Instagram. Another piece of the puzzle.
“June 26 1961 Valley Times Newspaper. My friend Hoodhistorian562 has been digging through old so cal newspapers and we’ve been keeping in touch with each other with the content we find, today he showed me this picture of a beautiful 40′ ford custom, the first car that came to mind when I saw this was the famous Valley Custom Dick Colarossi 40′, this is the same car, the Nerf bar is exactly the same except in this newspaper shot its bent, the front wheel openings look the same and the hood/trim line up, it has shaved handles, and the ride height is correct and the dead giveaway is underneath the hood look at the scoops the oil catch and everything is exactly in place as when Dick owned it. And the best part about this is when Dick sold his car in 1957 It was said to be in the San Fernando Valley at this time. So many things are the same it has to be the same car in 61′! Sadly there is no name of the person next to the ford in the newspaper.”

This photo was posted in the June 26 1961 Valley Times Newspaper, it shows the Calarossi 40 Ford with new hubcaps, and a modified (bend?) nerve bar up front. Sadly the article did not mention the name of the then owner, most likely the guy posing in front of it.
[divider]


[box_light]

The Most distinctive features on this 1940 Ford that might help locate the car today are:

  • Reshaped, raised wheel openings, with softened corners.
  • Running board exhaust tips
  • Shortened rear splash apron, reshaped lower edge on rear fenders.
  • Shaved door and trunk handles, with gas filler moved to inside the trunk.
  • Heavily reshaped dash with 6¬†Stewart Warner gauges.
  • 5 Inch stepped frame in the rear.

[/box_light]


[divider]

I had never seen the photos from the car with the aftermarket hubcaps, and fender skirts installed, as it can be seen in the much faded color photo from the 1954 International Motor Revue. These faded photos are the only photos that show the car with this set up. So I decided I wanted to have a better look at this set-up and used¬†the Ina Mae Overman¬†photo for a¬†Digital Restyling version. I added the right hubcaps, and added some material to the rear fenders, where the Valley Custom shop had opened up the wheel opening, and fender skirts to see how the car must have looked back in 1954… pretty neat, I like it. I gives the car a whole different feel.


CCC-dick-colarossi-valley-custom-17Digital restyled version shows the car as it looked in 1954, with full hubcaps and fender skirts. 
[divider]

(advertisement)

CCC-Sponsor-Kustoms-Illustrated-602

[divider]

CCC-Sponsor-KKB-Ford-02-602

[divider]


.

0

Ron Dunn Ford in paint

RON DUNN FORD IN PAINT

The Team at Steve’s Auto Restoration in Oregon are keeping up the pace on the Valley Custom Shop-built Ron Dunn Ford. At the end of October 2014 the body was painted Sierra Gold.

 
[dropcap]The[/dropcap] last time we reported on the Ron Dunn Restoration the car was at the Rodder’s Journal Studio in San Francisco for a famous Geoff Miles and Steve Coonan Bare Metal Photoshoot. In the meantime the feature has been published in the Rodder’s Journal #64, showing all the wonderful work the Valley Custom Shop team had done on the car in the early 1950’s. And the restoration team at Steve’s Auto Restoration in 2014.

CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-11-WOpenings spread of the Rodder’s Journal with the Ron Dunn bare metal article written¬†by Curt Iseli.
[divider]
 
 
After the Rodder’s Journal photo-shoot the was was taken apart again and it was time to freshen up the lead-work on the car. Most of the lead-work was done expertly by the in hours body and lead guy Bryan Bidema assisted by Steve. We are very fortunate that the team at SAR are documenting every step of the process, and even better are sharing it with the world. Thank you very much for that. It is a pleasure to see all this amazing work being done on this Milestone Custom.
 
CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-01-W

CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-02-W

CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-03-W

CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-04-W

CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-05-WSAR’s Bryan Bidema at work applying lead around the taillights of the Ford.
[divider]
 
CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-06-WAfter the lead-work the body was prepped for primer.
[divider]
 
CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-07-WFresh coats of primer which was followed by black sanding until the body was absolutely perfect.
[divider]
 
 
When the Ronn Dunn Ford¬†was redone in 1957, the team at the Valley Custom Shop had used a custom mixed color based off of Chevrolet’s ’57 Sierra Gold. During the restoration samples of this color were found inside the car, and the perfect match for the color was mixed from those samples. At the end of OCtober 2014 the Ron Dunn Ford was finally repainted again in the same color as it was in 1957. SAR’s Jay Spencer did the color matching on the paint as well as the painting of the car. And wow.. the color looks so good. I cannot wait to see the car getting back together over the next period. Stay tuned for more updates on the Valley Custom Shop, Ron Dunn Sectioned Shoebox restoration project.
 
CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-08-W

CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-09-W

CCC-valley-custom-ron-dunn-lead-10-W

 

 
CCC-logo-SAR
 
 

[divider]

 

(advertisement)

Kustom Kar Books Golden Sahara

[divider]

CCC-sledge-customs-sponsor-ad03-w

[divider]

ccc-sponsor-ad-customs-by-flash-w

[divider]

.

0