9 responses

  1. John Goschke
    January 18, 2014

    Their shoebox Fords are amazing! Great craftsmanship, design sense and tasteful restraint.

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  2. PalleJ
    January 18, 2014

    beautiful work Rob! and you have a good eye..those chops are spot on.
    good luck
    -palle

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  3. Renaud Zed Legardez
    January 20, 2014

    Fantastic work and style ! can’t wait to see them finished !

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  4. Jeff Neppl
    January 26, 2014

    This work is looking real real good. Rob your car looks fantastic.

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  5. KingKustoms
    February 6, 2014

    Wow, thanks for the kind words! Thank you for the great article, Rik! 🙂

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  6. Jerry Ferrier
    February 28, 2014

    If memory serves me KingKustoms has a Liston panoramic Ford inspired project going on too…

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  7. Eric H
    August 14, 2014

    Always top notch work from Rob!

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  8. Coby Scheldt
    March 3, 2018

    I’d like to see an article on chopping. I should say “over-chopping.” It seems almost endemic in our current idiom of “restyling” as they use to call it (I remember, I was born in ’46.) The ’49 to ’51 Mercs and the Matranga type ’39 to 41’s seem to be the body that will most support a “deeper” chop, but so many other bodies require (in my view of course) a much more careful apprehension of the rhythm of the entire finished shape. Just a shade too much chop and the body come off as simply BULBOUS. Fat, porcine, seriously lagging the beat. And the Beat is central to the overall effect of any rhythm i.e any Art, and our thing; as pure and potentially compelling Folk Art is no exception. Just bringing it up comrades. It’s like the recent fad of “laying frame.” A car dropped to about a flat cigarette (the REAL Devil Weed) pack height is well, I won’t say “bad ass” I don’t give a shit about “bad asses.” The whole scowling, shades, arms folded tightly across the chest like their nipples are in danger of flying off pose is such a transparent poser stance it’s embarrassing to witness. I’ll just say lowered to that point is moving. It has a strong RHYTHMIC effect. If it’s laying on the ground it looks broken. And vaguely stupid.
    However! Props to everyone doing the work, putting out the noble folk art, re-imagining the central totem of 100 years of American Kulture. The best to all of you.
    Coburnius Minimus
    Seattle

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