Paul Bragg Restyled 53 Oldsmobile

 

PAUL BRAGG Restyled 53 Olds

 

Paul Bragg aka TinGuy from Paso Robles California creates a stunning 1953 Oldsmobile 88 for customer Ralph Bagdasarian from Fresno California.



Metal master and Custom Car designer Paul Bragg has created many subtle and not so subtle Custom Cars and Hot Rods in the last couple of decades. Some of these were complete finished cars, others where projects he did a certain amount of work on, usually chopped tops, or other specific Custom Body Work.His work is always stunning, both in execution, as well as in style and balance, with respect for the history, but often with a twist of his own imagination.

A good number of years ago Paul was asked to do his magic on a 1953 Oldsmobile 88 two door sedan for a client Ralph Bagdasarian from Fresno. A really beautiful car to start with, but yet rarely seen as full Custom. The plan was a full custom as if it could have been done back in the mid 1950’s. Chopped top, custom head and taillights, smoothed body etc.





Together with Ralph, Paul made a plan and some sketches for the car. The top needed to come down a few inches, and the large rear window would become a much smaller size rear window from a ’49 Chrysler 4-door. The rear fenders would be extended and a set of ’54 Packard taillights installed. The front fenders would receive frenched headlight on slightly extended fenders. to stay in balance with the rear fenders. Rounded corners, shaved handles and emblems, angled B-pillars and scratch built long fender skirts were all part of the plan to create one super smooth uniquely restyled Custom Car. Paul did the majority of the work on the car over a period of time and the body worked sections were sprayed with primer and guide coats to make sure they would be smooth enough for the final primer.

The car was delivered like this to Ralph in Fresno many years ago, and is still patiently waiting among many other project to get finished. Hope, fully one day we will see this Paul Bragg master piece all finished and painted on the roads of sunny California. Lets take a look at some of the photos Paul Bragg took along the way of restyling Ralph Bagdasarian’s 1953 Oldsmobile Custom.

Early stages of the chopped top. All the glass was removed and the A pillars had been cut the right amount to drop the top to the perfect height. The C-pillars were cut slightly more for a nice flow of the roof. The door tops had been cut off and removed for this step. And since the B-Pillars were going to be angled forward they were just roughly cut at this stage.
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Paul and Ralph did not care for the large rear window, so a smaller unit from a ’49 Chrysler 4-door donor car was cut and set in place to flow with the forward slid roof. This photo shows that the rear portion of the roof angles down to much and will need to have some work done to flow with the new rear window which is set in on a steeper angle. The C-pillar has been tacked in place at this stage.
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Paul used small straps of thin sheet meal to see how much of the roof needs to be replaced with hand shaped metal to get the right shape. Notice that during this stage the rear glass is still in place. This helps get the flow of the new top just right.
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The glass is now removed, the old paint stripped and more sections of the Oldsmobile roof, that did not flow right, are cut off and removed. Paul has just started to fill in the gaps with freshly shaped sheet metal between the roof and the ’49 Chrysler 4-door rear window surrounding metal. Notice that the new rear window is in the same location as the old rear window and the rear of the roof line has not been moved forward. This creates extra optical length and flow to the roof.
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Starting on the passenger side, Paul shapes the new sail panels on his English Wheel. Using paper templates and a lot of patience he gets the panels to fit almost perfect, only needing very little work, and small amounts of lead to blend in with the cars roof and donor rear window.
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The completed rear portion of the roof, all metal finished and the edged feathered in with a small amount of shaped lead.
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After the top was cut down several inches it automatically moves forward. To overcome this, you can either lengthened the door post so that the top portion of the B-pillar lines up with the door line again, or you can, as Paul and Ralph decided to do on this Olds, angle the B-post forward. To make it look even better it was decided to round the door tops and later to remove the drip rail.
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Paul took the Olds half way the process to one of the Paso Robles West Coast Kustoms events. This side view gives us a good look at how great the chopped top with angled forward B-pillars looks. (Ulf “Wolf” Christiansson took the photo)
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Later Paul started to further restyle the car with the addition of ’54 Packard taillights, which required the rear fenders to be extended and the top of the fenders to be reshaped. The tops of quarter panels were lowered towards the rear, along with deck lid aprox. 3 inches, to create a better flow. Paul also filled in the holes left from the door handles and gas cap at this point. The roof is now in primer with a guide coat to check for any imperfections. The car is now also mounted on a set of wide white wall tires that hep with the overall vision of the car during this process.
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This photo shows the restyled drivers side rear fender with the Packard light installed and the stock Olds rear fender on the passenger side. It also shows why the rear fenders had to be extended to be able to use these taillights. The point at the front of the taillight needs to clear the trunk. The splash pan was molded in, and the holes left from the trunk trim and handle have been filled.
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Drivers side rear fenders all metal worked and ready for primer.
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The angled forward B-pillar, rounded corners and shaved drip rail makes the top look very smooth. Notice how the shape of the rear quarter window is flowing with the shape of the top. New hand made long fender skirts are test fitted.
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Stepping back from the car we can really take a good look at the new wonderful flow of the chopped top, shaved drip rail and smaller rear window. The angles and shape of the Packard taillights work beautiful on the Oldsmobile.
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Paul also installed a set of Appleton Spotlights. Beautiful lines, perfect stance.
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Front fenders are extended with molded in Mercury headlight rings.
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The passenger side of the car gets the Packard Taillights in extended fenders treatment. (FLAT-TOP BOB picture)
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With all the fresh restyling in a coat of primer and guide coat. This is how the car was deliverd to the client, and this is the last update we have seen of the Oldsmoible. The car has very nice proportions, beautiful lines and I really hope the car will be finished in the near future.
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Rear quarter view shows the beautiful shape of the chopped top and the donor rear window.
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Paul Bragg 1949 Mercury

PAUL BRAGG 1949 MERCURY

Master Customizer Paul Bragg built this 1949 Mercury in the early 1980’s. A masterpiece of style, balance and perfection.

 
[dropcap]I[/dropcap] cannot remember when I saw pictures of Paul Bragg’s two tone green 1949 Mercury for the first time. It could very well be the 6 page article in Car Culture DeLuxe magazine, or perhaps somewhere on-line.¬†But I do know that when I saw it, the car had a big impact on me. Paul’s personal 1949 Mercury is a rather subtile Mercury, nothing really wild, and it has customizing parts that have been¬†used many times before on a 49-51 Mercury. But the whole package, the amount and style of the chop, the stance, the color, it is¬†all just perfect. The overall proportions on the Paul Bragg 1949 Mercury make¬†this car¬†an absolute classic masterpiece.

Paul found this 1949 Mercury at a Santa Maria junk yard in the late 1970’s. Paul had heard about this yard with mostly Cadillac and Lincoln cars, and how its content was listed to be crushed. Paul took a look and stored in the back with at least 200 cars in front of it, he found this mostly complete 1949 Mercury. There was just no way he would be able to get it out of there though. All he could do was get back to the yard later¬†and hope they had not gotten to the Merc to crush it yet. The whole section of the yard where the Merc was parked was scheduled to be crushed in the portable crusher. But they could not tell Paul when they estimated to get to the section the Merc was located. Fortunately Paul showed up just as they were getting ready to lift the car out with a chain through the doors. Paul payed¬†$200.- for the Mercury and put it on the trailer he bought, and drove it¬†home. Now the fun stuff could start.

CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-01Paul’s Mercury all the way in the back of the yard.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-02Hard to imagine that all these¬†cars were crushed!! Paul’s Mercury is al the way in the back, not visable in this photo.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-03The Merc safe t home, and Paul is already starting to take it apart.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-04The first things Paul was molding a set of 1952 Mercury headlight rings to the front fenders, mold in the grille surround and round the hood corners with just the perfect radius.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-11This photo shows Paul’s metal master work on the front fenders, Frenched headlights, molded grille surround, rounded hood corners, filled parking lights and molded splash pan, all finished in lead.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-05When the work on the hood and front fenders was done he added primer to those sections, and then it was time for the chop. In this photo Paul had cut the front 3 inches and the back enough to give it an pleasant, or call it perfect flow. Many time stepping back and checking the work, then cutting a little more ended up in a removal of about 5 inches in the back. The rear window section was still uncut at this moment. Paul also removed the door handles at this point.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-06Using a metal rod the flow of the top to the rear window and trunk was established. This photo shows how much the rear of the top needs to be moved up to get in line with the laid forward rear window. The lower edge of the rear window remains in the stock position, the top of the rear window surrounded metal was pushed down to get in line with the rod for the perfect flow.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-08Relieve cuts were made in the top to be able to push it up to meet the rear window surround, the flow from the rear window into the top is now absolutely perfect.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-07Paul used some paper to see if the flow on the c-pillars was good, and how the metal filler pieces would need to be shaped.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-09The glass was removed, and extra rods welded in the rear window opening before the rear window surround was welded solid and all the filler pieces for the c-pillar and lower roof sections were fabricated and welded in place.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-10The drip rails were shaved and Paul decided to go with a forward angled B-Pillar design for his Mercury. The top corners were rounded. Paul spend a lot of work here to get the flow just right.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-14Passenger door frame all metal finished. And it looks very good.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-13The rear of the top all metal finished.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-12The rear quarter windows all metal finished. The shape of the rear quarter window flows very nicely into the rounded corner of the door opening. Some carefull planning and cutting goes into this. An very important step when you remove the drip rail from a 49-51 Mercury.
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CCC-paul-bragg-49-mercury-16The mercury with all the fresh metal worked restyling¬†on the trailer being moved to the Bragg’s¬†new house in Nipomo.¬†
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Paul Bragg has chopped many 1949-51 Mercury’s in his long career, and each of them he chops in a different way. One things that is particular nice on Paul’s 1949 Mercury is the rather sharp rear corner on the rear quarter windows. This sharper corner works really well with the flow of the top, but also with the angled forward B-Pillars. With the body work now in primer Paul is very happy and cannot wait to get the rest of the car done so that he can drive it, but first they have to move into a new home.
 

This is a two page article!

Continue reading on page two.
 
 

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Paul Bragg 1950 Ford Convertible

 

PAUL BRAGG 1950 FORD CONVERTIBLE

 

Paul Bragg’s perfect eye for Custom Restyling makes him able to do any Custom job needed, including creating a perfectly styled removable Carson style Padded Top.



Paul Bragg has been building custom cars for many decades. He is world-wide known for his fantastic metal working skills and excellent taste in Custom Car design. Paul combines his metal working skills with an very good eye for proportions, lines and style. Allowing him to modify virtually anything he feels is needed for the perfect custom. We will devote several articles on Paul, and the wonderful Custom Cars he creates. This article will cover the creation of a chopped convertible windshield and the frame construction for a removable padded top.

Paul did not do all the work on this car. In fact the main customizing was already done when the project came to Paul. Bill Reasoner did the majority of custom work on this 1950 Ford convertible in the early 1990’s. It includes extended front fenders with frenched headlights. Mercury grille opening with a 1959 Chrysler Imperial grille, rounded hood openings, molded splash mans front and rear, Mercury taillights with reshaped wind-split.

Lets take a look how Paul chopped the windshield, and created the removable padded top structure and window moldings.


CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-01This is how Paul received the Ford. Customized, but with the stock height windshield and a stock foldable soft top.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-02First oder of the day was disassemble and take out the interior, the windshield, windshield trim and rubber and remove the soft top completely. 
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-03The original wood header bar from the soft top was the only thing Paul kept on the car. This would be used on the padded top later as well. The header bar was secured with factory pins and this was a proven system, so why change it.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-04Next step was to grind down the paint where the the windshield frames were going to be cut for the chop Masking tape marks how much Paul will remove from the windshield posts.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-05The cuts are made, the material removed and the top portion rest on the bottom portion to check it all out. Obviously the vent windows need to be chopped as well..
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-06To make sure everything lines up correctly it is needed to make a few relieve cuts on the lower and top portion of the A-Pillar. The top portion of the A-Pillar can be moved out slightly, and the bottom portion of the A-Pillare can be moved inward a little so that the top and bottom fit together perfectly again. This photo shows the completely welded and metal finished A-Pillars. Paul has also cut down the vent windows, and is working on the door window trim. Templates are made to make sure the left and right side are even.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-07With the windshield and side window frames chopped it was time to get the shape of the lower edge of the padded top to fit the side glass trim perfectly. Paul made an plywood template to make sure both sides would be exactly the same. Then he carfully created the frame from U-Channel. 
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-08Here Paul is test fitting the new window trim and checking if the look and feel is what he had in mind.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-09This next step is really crucial. If at all possible take the car outside to a space where you can walk around the car and be able to step back and look at the car from every angle. It is now time to figure out the actual shape of the padded top. Using some¬†scrap wood and a thin strip of metal Paul shaped the outside contour of the padded top. He screws down the metal strip to the front header, and to the ‚Äď in this case two ‚Äď temporarily wood pieces. With this metal strip in the right shape it is time for Paul to start bending the tubing for the bows. As you can see there is enough space between the side window frames and the U-Channel of the top. This is to allows upholstery and weather material to be used.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-10The metal strip is the guide line for bending and cutting down the side to side bows, make sure both sides are the same, check and recheck, then spot-weld them the the U-Channel frame.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-11Paul created his own release mechanism for the top. a main pin hold secure in place with a spring loaded pin. To make sure it works Paul sketched his plan.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-12TThe top frame work is now mostly done, this photo shoes one of the pints to hold down the top to the body. The top is turned upside down in this photo.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-13Another look at the top shows the hand shaped metal panels for the rear portion of the top. These panels make sure the upholstery will not sag over time.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-14The finished frame work back on the car for a final check. At this time it is really important to check the shape over and over again from each and every angle possible. If you want to change it, this is the time. Once its off to the upholstery you cannot change it anymore without spending a lot of money.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-15Glass templates are created.
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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-16And the stainless window trim is cut to size and test fitted.
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Now it was time to get the top upholstered. The car was send out to¬†Rick Simmons who did a fantastic job on the padded top and stitching the interior for the ’50 Ford convertible as well. The top has a wonderful original Carson or Gaylord top feeling to is. The stitching on it is really fantastic.


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CCC-paul-bragg-50-ford-conv-19From all angles the top Paul and Rick created looks really amazing. The top flows perfectly thanks to the carefully shaped metal strip and top bows Paul created.
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The car was later finished in a wonderful metallic champaign color.


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Paul Bragg Livingston Merc

 

PAUL BRAGG LINVINGSTON MERC

 

Every body panel on Frank Livingston’s¬†’49 Mercury was reworked by metal master Paul Bragg. This article shows what was needed to create this styling masterpiece.



[dropcap]P[/dropcap]aul Bragg has been building custom cars for many decades. He is world wide known for his fantastic metal working skills and excellent taste in Custom Car design. Paul combines his metal working skills with an¬†very good eye for proportions, lines and style. Allowing him to modify¬†virtually anything he feels is needed for the perfect custom. Paul has restyled a lot of¬†¬†’49 – ’51 Mercury’s, and each of them styled¬†differently, and chopped in way that fits that particular restyled car the best. We will devote several articles about Paul, and the wonderful Custom Cars he creates, stay tuned. This first article is about an extensively restyled 1949 Mercury Paul built for Frank Livingston.


CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-23-wBefore starting to cut up a car, Paul usually makes a few sketches of what he has in mind for a particular car. It helps him to see if all the design elements work together but it also allows the client to see which direction Paul has planned for them.
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Frank Livingston is no stranger when itmcomes to Custom Cars. Ever since the mid 1950’s Frank has owned Custom Cars, some of them were famous, made the magazines and even some covers. He showed his car at many famous car shows. And Frank is still at it today, very active promoting and enjoying Custom Cars. In the early 1990’s Frank had his most restyled custom¬†to date, a ’49 Mercury named “Moon Fire” built by some of the top shops in the field, including Paul Bragg Rods & Customs out of Paso Robles in California.



The top

Frank Livingston approuched Paul Bragg for a new custom based on his ’49 Mercury they discussed what could and needed to be done to the car. Paul had a very clear vision how the car should look. He made several sketches to show Frank what he had mind. What Paul had in mind was not your average “basic” custom job. The sketched showed that nearly every body panel would need to be reshaped to match the sketches. When both approved on how the car should end up looking it was time to start cutting up the Mercury body.¬†Paul started with chopping the top, he removed 4.5 inches from the front and nearly 6 inches from the C-pillars. Paul removed the drip rails, and leaned the B-pillars forward. At the back he removed the stock rear window, and most of the surrounding metal. He used an ’49 Chrysler rear window reshaped the rear quarter windows and hand formed the complete rear portion of the roof and turret panel. The end result is an unique shaped top that flows gently towards the trunk and has perfect proportions from every angle you look at it. The Plymouth rear window¬†fitted better with the trunk changes Paul had in mind for the car. Going for the smoothed look Paul decided the belt line trim had to go as well, and the sharp edge was filled in and smoothed. An old trick the Ayala’s and Barris shops also loved to do.


CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-24-wThis photo taken in the early stages shows how Paul incorporated the ’49 Chrysler rear window. And how much new shaped metal was needed to get the desired look. Also not the sharp edge where the belt line trim used to be.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-25-wThe metal work on the top portion of the car is all done, and paul is ready to apply the first coats of primer. Take a close look at the flow of this top, and notice the molded in and smoothed belt line.
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The sides

With the top portion of the car in primer it was time to move to the lower parts of the car that needed to be restyled. The front wheel openings were lipped using the wheel opening from an ’55 Plymouth. At the rocker panels Paul created a hand shaped panel to extend this lip from the front wheel opening all the way to¬†rear quarters where it would end at the leading edge of a custom made forward angled scoop. The angle of the scoop is set at the same angle as the B-Pillar. Paul originally planned to¬†update the side trim with a much wider ’53 Mercury unit. And shaped the scoop top leading edge to¬†follow the bottom edge of the side trim closely. At a later stage Frank decided he did not like the heavy trim and asked Paul to add a much thinner unit.

Paul wanted flush fitted skirts on the car, but decided they needed to be much longer¬†than on the stock rear wheel opening mercury. So he cut out a little oversized section from¬†the rear quarter panel, he then formed¬†a metal¬†lip to finish the new opening. But before he welded that into place, he used this lip¬†to shape the new flush fit fender skirts first in wire, and later,in sheet metal. Once the skirts were up to Pauls’s standards he welded the lip to the rear quarters. Paul created a set of wonderfully styled larger flish fitting fender skirts.


CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-08-wThe new opening lip for the rear wheel opening was used to shape a wire frame for the new flush fitting skirts. 
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-07-wThe metal lip has now been welded to the enlarged and reshaped opening. Notice the quarter panel scoop and how the angle matches the B-Pillar.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-05-wThe back side of the hand made passenger side fender skirt.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-06-wThe finished skirts in place.
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The rear

Paul then moved further back and started there with the rear bumper. Paul used a 1951 Mercury front bumper and reshaped it to fit flush with the body. He used a narrowed 1955 Pontiac license plate cover and molded that onto the bumper. Next he created a flush fitting splash pan that followed the shape of the bumper ¬†including the raised center section. This raised center section would be the base for the recessed section on the trunk The top portion of the recess was shaped into a scoop with similar styling as the quarter panel scoops. The¬†shape of the molded in splash pan was extended to the sides of the body where they would follow the ends pieces of the ’51 Mercury bumper. The Mercury body line extending from the front fenders was extended horizontal towards the rear where it falls down to the bottom on a stock Mercury. This extended section was the base for the hand shaped three part¬†taillights. Paul also moved the so called “dog leg” dip in the doors towards the back of the door. Making the dip much less pronounced.


CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-04-wMost of the hard body work on the rear section is completed in this photo. The trunk was heavily reshaped with rounded corners and cut out to folow the shape of the custom bumper. This bumper will fit flush in the new opening created for it.
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The front

The body work done so far was prepped and a few coats of primer were added to seal the work. It was now time to move to the front of the car. Here a lot of work was needed to make Paul’s ideas come to live in metal. Paul started with narrowing a ’51 Mercury bumper and move it forward from the stock bumper position. This forward position of the bumper would be the base for everything else done on the front of the car. Paul welded the headlight bezels to the front fenders a few inches forward from its stock position. He then used cardboard to figure out the metal shapes he needed to create for the new extended fender shapes. The section below the headlights was angled forward at the same angle as the B-Pillar. A new splash pan was created that would fit on top of the bumper.¬†The splash pan would folow the shape of the bumper in a similar way as was done on the rear bumper and would flow nicely into the new lipped front wheel openings.

Paul hand made a new grille opening with shapes inspired from the Hirohata Mercury. The hood was extended down and would incorporate the lipped grille opening center section. At the back of the hood the ends were cut of and welded to the front fenders and top of the cowl. All corners on the car were rounded and with all the new elements roughed in shape it was time to metal finish the last sections of the car before Paul would add more primer to the whole car.


CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-09-wThe forward mounted narrowed ‘1951 mercury front bumper. The ’55 Plymouth lipped front wheel openings are already in place here. The Plymouth lipped opening have a more gentle curve than the often used 1952-54 Mercury units.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-10-wThe front fenders were extended by welding the headlight bezels to wire rods welded to the fenders. The cardboard templates were later transferred to sheet metal which were shaped to fit. The center section of the new splash pan can also be seen in this photo. Notice how it overlaps the front bumper, and how a nice rolled end was already created for a nice finish look.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-12-wHalf of the new shaped front section of the front fenders is in place now.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-11-wAll body work on the mercury was hammer welded and metal finished.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-13-wWith the work on the extended fenders done it was time to start shaping the new grille opening. In this photo the bottom portion is already welded in place. The top portion is shaped, but not in place yet.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-26-wThe top portion is now in place and the hood section is cut of and the ends filled in.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-17-wThe whole restyled front end is finished and now its time for lead and metal finish to perfection.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-16-wLeaded and sanded smooth. Notice the wonderful curves and shaped of the restyled elements.
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This photo shows the work done on the back side of the hood as well as the work on the rocker panels that flow into the lipped front wheel opening on the front and the scoop at the rear.
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The finished car

After Paul Bragg’s work on Frank’s Mercury was finished and the car was in primer Frank took the car to¬†Bill Reasoner in Walnut Creek, for the pearl aqua blue¬†paint job Paul created a custom grille from bumper guards and 1953 Mercury bullets and customized a set of 1953 Cadillac hubcaps. After Bill Reasoner was done painting the car, Frank took the car to¬†Jerry Sahagon for a custom interior.The Finished mercury is a great example of wonderful custom restyling. Basically no panel was left untouched to create¬†this Paul Bragg masterpiece. It hints to the early Customizers Ayala and Barris brothers, but also incorporates Paul Bragg’s personal styling elements and modern details. The Paul Bragg Livingston Merc is a true masterpiece.


CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-01-wPaul reshaped the ’51 Mercury front bumper by narrowing it to fit flush with the fnders and adding a new center section created for a second ’51 Mercury bumper. The grille is a work of art in itself as well. (Frank Paul photo)

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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-03-wThe flow of the new top, the reshaped rear quarter windows and angled forward B-Pillars look particularly nice from this rear 3/4 angle. (Frank Paul photo)
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-02-wPaul even restyled the ’53 Cadillac hubcaps with custom made center sections. (Frank Paul photo)
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-22-wA good look at the rear of the car showed the wonderful reshaped ’51 Mercury front bumper and how its shape extends into the rear quarter panels.This photo also shows how the lip of the front wheel opening flows into the rocker panel.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-21-wEverything on Frank’s Mercury flows and all the lines are there for a reason.
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-20-wThe Mercury at the Sacramento Autorama where the car was a huge crowd pleaser. 
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CCC-paul-bragg-livingston-19-wFrank Livingston polishing and detailing the grille on set up day of the Sacramento Autorama. 
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