Bill DeCarr Old Body Shop

 

DECARR OLD BODY SHOP

 

After having worked at the Barris Kustom shop for many years, Bill DeCarr openeded up his own body shop. Lets take a look at some photos of Bill DeCarr Old Body Shop from the Larry Watson Collection.

 
[box_light]This article shows a selection of photos of photos taken at the old Bill DeCarr Body Shop. All¬†of these¬†photos come from the Larry Watson Personal Photo Collection. More on Larry’s personal collection can be found in the¬†Larry Watson section¬†on the CCC-Site. Or on the¬†Custom Car Photo Archive.¬†Special thanks to Roger O’Dell for scanning this amazing material and sharing them with us on the Custom Car Chronicle.[/box_light]
 
 
Before Bill DeCarr moved to the shop where he would be the most prolific, the Artesia Blvd. Shop, Bill shared a Speed and Custom Shop with Bill Bickel and Lee Shelton in Bellflower. The Shop / gas-station was called Bill’s Speed and Custom Shop, were¬†Bill DeCarr took care of the Custom work, while Bill Bickel was responsible for all the mechanical jobs in the shop.

 

CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-00Beautiful mild customized candy purple 1956 Chevy sitting in front of the Bill DeCarr shop. Notice that the name on the sign is still Bill Ortega, but soon after this, Bill would change his name from Ortega to DeCarr. The shop was shared with Bill Bickel who ran the technical part of the Speed and custom shop.
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Bill DeCarr had been working at the Barris Kustom Shop for many years, and in the late 1950’s Bill decided that it was time to get started on his own. Bill was a terrific¬†body guy who worked on a great number of famous and not so famous Customs produced at the Barris Shop. He had become good friends with Larry Watson and when Bill started to work in his own shop he worked close with Larry Watson who had his shop first at¬†1016 E Artesia Shop North Long Beach, and in 1959 when most of the photos in this article where taken, in his famous 9012 Rosecrans Avenue shop in Bellflower.

Bill DeCarr would start the projects with the custom restyling and the finishing boy work, then on to primer before the cars were taken to Larry Watson for a new high end paint job. This collaboration would continue for many years. In the Larry Watson Personal Collection there is a selection of photos from Bill’s old shop. Most of these photos are dated November 1959, and a lot of them are rather fuzzy. Possibly the camera used was broken, or the settings were off. We have asked a lot of people about this shop, Barry Mazza even talked to Bill DeCarr’s widow about it, but nobody seams to remember much about it.
 

CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-07This very mild 1949 Ford Convertible can be seen in several photos at this shops location, as well as at Bill’s next shop on Artesia Blvd. Perhaps it was Bill’s personal ride, or one of his employees?
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-08The Ford had a really nicely done interior in white with green tuck & roll panels and white piping.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-09Fred LeFevre nearly finished 1959 ElCamino sitting front of the shop. Larry Watson had painted the Chevy after Bill DeCarr had performed the bodywork. More projects, and possibly employee cars in the background.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-01Fred LeFevre’s Elcamino is now finished in its first version, and parked next to it is Jones his 1959 Ford Ranchero also with body work by Bill DeCarr and paint by Larry Watson.¬†
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Jones 1959 Ranchero

Among the photos taken in November 1959 are a couple blurry shots of a very nicely done 1959 Ford Ranchero. The only thing we know about the car is that the owner’s name was Jones, and that the body work was done by Bill DeCarr and the paint in off-white pearl by Larry Watson.
 

CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-04Well dressed Jones showing off his California raked Ranchero. Bill’s work was to clean up the body, removing emblems and scripts. The great stance, perfect size white walls, four bar flipper hubcap and lake pipes are so right for this car.¬†
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-03The handle on the tailgate was removed as well as the logo below it and the Ranchero scripts on the top of the rear fenders.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-02At the front we can see dummy spotlights, shaved hood, shaved fender tops and a chromed tubular grille. 
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-06This photo of the Jones Ranchero was taken at Bill’s later shop on Artesia Blvd in Bellflower. I have included them since they show the car a bit better than the photos taken in 1959 at the old shop. And these show how nice the car was with subtile body work and a wonderful off-white pearl paint job by Larry Watson.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-05We assume the guy next to the Ranchero is Jones, but we have no idea who he is. If anybody knows anything more about Jones and or his 1959 El Camino, please let us know so we can add the info here.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-01-10Lot of “movement” in this low angle photo showing body work done on a 1957 Chevy. The hood rockets¬†are removed and the wind-splits extended forward and shaped into a nice peak.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-signClose up of the Bill Ortega sign on the front of the building. Bill’s sign was on the left side of the building and read:¬†BILL’S BODY CUSTOM SHOP ALL TYPES CUSTOM WORK BODY-FENDER¬†Bill Ortega
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-old-shop-sign-02The Right side of the building had the big sign with the main title BILL’S SPEED & CUSTOM SHOP and the names Bill Bickel on the left and Lee Shelton on the far right.
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1955 Pontiac

Several photos have been taken of this unidentified 1955 Pontiac Hard Top that was taken to the¬†Bill’s old shop for some custom restyling.¬†The car already had a nice Californian stance when Bill got to work on it. Bill was hired to do some mild updating, typical for the time the car was created, 1959. He¬†removed the door handles, shaved the trunk and modified the taillight and back up lights to accepts 1959 Cadillac taillights. The 1959 Cadillac taillights were brand new items back then, and had not yet been over-used.

CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-01This photo was taken at the shop before Bill DeCar was starting to restyle the car. We can see that the car already had a California rake stance, and modified exhaust.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-02The front shows the center bar of the grille had been removed and a new tubular grille had been constructed before the owner decided to have some body work and new paint done.
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Bill also set in the license plate in between the two bumper sections. At the front Bill frenched the headlights and modified the scoops on top of the fenders. He removed the trim on the hood, except for the ribbed sections, which add optical length to the car. Sadly the Larry Watson Personal Collection did not have any photos of this car further than this primer spot stage. So we have no idea if Larry ended up painting it or not.

 

CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-03The next batch of photos were taken when Bill’s work was finished on the car, and it was ready for a new paint job. The car was¬†shaved, smoothed and with some restyling on the taillights and the sunken plate in between the bumper.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-04At the front Bill frenched the headlights, removed the fender top scoop trim pieces and molded in a shaped round rod as the leading edge of the scoops. The hood emblem and ornament were removed, creating a nice smooth front end.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-07The headlight fender scoop on a stock 1955 Pontiac are already very attractive, but smoothed and reshaped like Bill did on this one makes it looks even nicer.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-06The taillight and parking light pods were modified to accept brand new 1959 Cadillac taillights. Notice the small scoops on the top of the fender, similar to the once created on the front fenders.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-05Bill removed the bumper over rider and reshaped the lower pan below the trunk to have the license plate set in. 
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-Pontiac-08Sadly there are no photos of the car with the front bumper installed, or even with a new paint job We have never been able to find out anything more about this car, and how it looked when it was finished.
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CCC-watson-bill-decarr-bills-speed-shopIn one of the photos we spotted this 1957 Ford with the 76 as well as Bill’s Speed and Custom Shop emblems painted on its side. Not sure if this was one of the owners cars to help promote the shop, or if it was a race car sponsored by the shop / gas-station.
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Watsons – Terry Holloway Plymouth

 

WATSONS – TERRY HOLLOWAY PLYMOUTH

 

The paint job Larry Watson created on Terry’s 1957 Plymouth in the late 1950’s is one of the his finest and most recognizable.



[dropcap]W[/dropcap]e have mentioned before that Larry Watson had a eye for what a car needed when it came to color, and color design. The outline-paint-job he created on¬†Terry Holloway’s 1957 Plymouth is a perfect example of this EYE. By using nothing but paint Larry was able to create a much sleeker car out of this Plymouth. The car looked longer, lower and so much more interesting¬†than how it came from the factory. The color choice, olive green with cream is a rather unusual down to earth choice, but it really suits¬†very¬†well for this car. It looks perfect in place, gives it perhaps even a sort of factory classic look.

Before Larry would apply his magic to Terry’s Plymouth Belvedere, an unknown body man performed some mild customizing to the cars body. All the emblems from the body were shaved, the holes filled and the body ¬†smoothed.¬†The door handles and trunk lock remained¬†in place. The lower front pan, below the front bumper, of a Plymouth Fury, which looked better with the smoothed body, was used. The car was lowered all around, and a set of Dodge Lancer four bar hubcaps were used on medium wide white wall tires.¬†The hubcaps were color detailed in the center. A full length set of lake pipes was added to the bottom of the rocker panels.


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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-07-wThis photo must have been taken shortly after the car was finished. Several of Larry’s creations were photographed on this location (most likely all at the same day). Other photos from this photoshoot appeared in several magazines. Terry had not installed the Dummy Spotlights on his car yet. Most other photos show the car with the paint detailed¬†spotlights.
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The photo you can see here, shows the car from a great angle. It shows very well what can be done with color on a Custom Car. And Larry picked just the right colors for Terry’s Plymouth. The rear fenders look taller, the body slimmer.
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Then Larry painted the whole body in a soft cream color. Next Larry¬†laid¬†out the perfect size outlines around the body contours and side trim. The main¬†body was then painted with a wonderful pearl olive color. After the taped of sections were cleaned Larry outlined the new sections with dark green. Unique on Terry’s Plymouth are the partly painted bumpers. Larry used Candy green outlined in white for this special effect.


CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-01-wInteresting snapshot from a Jim Potter photo shoot shows Terry’s Plymouth with Jim Parker’s 1957 T-Bird, LaVonne Bathke’s 1958 Corvette, and Larry’s Personal 1958 T-Bird in the background. This photo shows the Fury front pan really good. Besides painting the bumpers Larry also paint detailed the dummy spotlights, which can be clearly seen in this snapshot.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-22-wTerry’s Plymouth was also part of the famous Jim Potter parking at Watson’s color photo shoot.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-21-wTerry’s Plymouth appeared in several early 1960’s magazine, but the car never had its own full magazine feature.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-20-wA¬†6 page article on Larry Watson in the July 1959 issue of Car Speed and Style magazine was credited to James Richards¬†(Jim Potter nick-named¬†himself¬≠ with that name, when he wrote for the East Coast magazines). Terry’s Plymouth is included with two photos.
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This color photo of Terry’s car appeared on the cover of July 1960 issue of Motor Life magazine as part of their “The Best CUSTOM of the Year” competition, which was won by Darryl Starbird’s “Predicta”. Terry’s Plymouth ended on the 18th place, out of 30 pre-selected customs. These photos show the car with no spotlights taken at the same location as the openings photo.
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The Update in early 1960.

Two of the photos from Terry’s Plymouth from the Larry Watson Personal Collection are dated. One of the photos showing the car at Bill DeCarr’s body shop for a remake is dated April 1960. And the last photo in this article showing the car in dark gray primer,¬†is dated October 1962. So we know that Terry decided to update his car in early 1960’s perhaps a year or so after the first version of the car was finished. And before the car appeared on the cover of Motor Fife magazine.

The in progress photos of the Terry’s Plymouth are all taken at the Bill DeCarr body shop on Artesia blvd. The shop were Larry hired the paint booth during the early 1960’s.¬†Perhaps Terry wanted something new for the upcoming new car show season.¬†Bill DeCarr was hired to do the updated customizing on the car which included reworked front and rear with new canted bumper surounds, shaved door handles and reshaped fins


CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-13-wOne of the photos from the second phase of Terry’s Custom Plymouth is dates April 1960. The others do not have a date on it, but are all taken at the Bill DeCarr Artesia Blvd shop.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-08-wThe second phase starts with the removal of the front and rear bumpers. The plan is to create rolled bumpers with sculptured sections, most likely to hold custom made split bumpers.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-10-wThe original front pan was cut off to make place for the new unit.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-09-wNew shapes for the front end were created using bend tubing welded together, positioned at an angle, and molded into the front using shaped sheet metal. 
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-11-wAt the rear similar shaped openings were created from bend tubing, and welded to the stock splash pan. At the rear these new units were mounted horizontal.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-12-wThe section in between the tubular openings was filled in with a shaped panel which was tacked in place in this photo. 
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-14-wA wider angle shows more work was done at the back. The fin’s were reshaped at the top with cut in half tubing welded to the top. Rounded trunk corners are sketched with masking tape.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-15-wView from the drivers side shows that during this process the side trim pieces were left in place. I wonder how hard it must have been to sand down that amazing Watson paint job to be able to do the new body work.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-16-wA bit later in the process we can see the new openings are now nicely molded an leaded smooth ready the final primer. The trunk corners are now rounded with the radius marked by the masking tape shown in an earlier photo.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-17-wThe body work at the back is now finished and in primer. The fins are slightly extended and reshaped at the top.
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CCC-terry-holloway-57-plym-18-wDated October 1962, all body work was done and the car is completely in primer. 
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The last photo of Terry’s 1975 Plymouth is from 1962. The car can be seen in black or dark gray primer with all the body work finished. We have not been able to find out what happened with the car after this. Since there are no more photos in Larry’s Collection we assume the car was not painted again by Larry. Perhaps Terry lost interest in the car and sold it at this point to somebody who took it elsewhere to finish.¬†We are still looking to find out more info on what happened to this car after 1962. If you know more about this, please let us know so that we can add it to this article.


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[box_light]This article shows a selection of photos of a car painted by Larry Watson. Most of these photos come from the Larry Watson Personal Photo Collection. More on Larry’s personal collection can be found in the Larry Watson section on the CCC-Site. Or on the Custom Car Photo Archive.[/box_light]










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Bill Ortega 1941 Mercury

 

BILL DECARR 1941 MERCURY

 

The late Bill DeCarr built this perfectly styled, 1941 Mercury Coupe as his personal car, while he worked at the Barris Kustom shop in the late 1940’s.



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Some of the very best custom cars from the golden age of customizing never received the credits they deserved. One of those cars is the Bill DeCarr 1941 Mercury. In my eyes, one of the best restyled 41-48 Ford/Mercury created back in the day, for sure a Milestone Custom. Bill restyled his mercury while he worked at the Barris Compton Avenue shop in the later part of the 1940’s. At the time there were no Custom Car related magazines out there to feature Bill’s car in. And by the time those magazine were published in the early 1950’s, the 1941 Mercury had left California and with that basically the option of being featured and shown to the US and even world audience. (Bill DeCarr was born Bill Ortega, but changed his name to Bill DeCarr in the 1950’s.)

Fortunately George Barris took several photos of Bill’s Mercury when it was finished and a few when it was getting built. Those photos were shown in several of the books Barris produced. And now we could for the first time really enjoy the sense of style and craftsmanship Bill DeCarr¬†had and put into his Mercury. And possibly the best thing of all is that the car survived, and was recently restored back to how it first looked in the late 1940’s.

 CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-19-WWe are not 100% sure, but most likely this is the early stages of the Bill DeCarr 1941 Mercury. Getting shopped in front of the Barris Compton Avenue shop.
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Bill started with a short door (business-) Coupe model 1941 Mercury. The Mercury’s had a three inch longer wheel base than the same year Fords. This extra length in front of the cowl was perfect for the long and low effect Bill was looking for. Bill lowered the car with a nice speed-boat stance. Bill modified the front of the car to accept a 1948 Oldsmobile grille. He molded in the stock headlight bezels. and reshaped the front wheel openings to make the car look even lower than it already was. He ten chopped the top around 4 inches in the front and more in the back to give the body a nice backward sloop. Bill spend a lot of time on the rear portion of the roof to get the proportions just perfect. The back door tops were rounded to flow better with the roof. These short door coupes are not easy to chop right. But Bill sure succeeded in this. To further enhance the speed boat stance and length of the car Bill created full fade away fenders. The panels to create this were molded into the body with a nice radius. The long 1941 fender skirts follow the lines of the fade away fenders and lead your eyes all the way to the back of the car. The fender character lines on both front and rear fenders was hammered out to create smooth fender sides which worked much better with the fade away panels. All handles and stainless trim were removed and the holes welded for the ultimate smooth look.

At the back the fenders were molded to the body with a nice radius. The gas cap was welded shut and the filler cap replaced inside the trunk. The stock taillights were shaved and new taillights were created in the 1848 Ford bumper guards. The stock bumpers were replace with what looks like 1949 Ford bumpers. Bill then painted the car in deep maroon, and finished it with a set of white wall tires, Cadillac Sombrero hubcaps and Appleton Spotlight. Perfection.

CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-16-WGeorge Barris took this photo of Bill’s Mercury sitting at the back of the Barris Shop. Most of the work on Bill’s Mercury and the mercury has been covered with multiple coats of primer.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-21-WThe rear view ¬†of Bill’s Mercury shows a lot of similarities with Jack Stewart’s 1941 Ford. Bill’s car was done first and had bumper guard taillights, a trick from the late 1940’s. While Jack’s Ford had hand made lenses set into hand shaped pods molded onto the rear fenders.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-17-WThe Finished Mercury with perfect proportions. The long nose works really well with the Oldsmobile grille and long fade away fenders. The photo was taken at the Barris Bell shop around 1949-50.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-03-WCarl Abajian fooling around in this Bill Gaylord photo of the Mercury. Perhaps the car had a Gaylord interior.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-20-WMost likely Bill DeCarr gave this blurry snapshot, of his 1941 Mercury, to his good friend Larry Watson. It is part of the Larry Watson personal collection. Notice the rocks on both cars preventing them to roll downhill.
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Bill sold the car to¬†Dick Hansen of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. At that time, or shortly after that the car was repainted in a petrol green. One small photo of the car appeared in the Trend Book No. 101 Custom Cars published in July 1951. However Barris was listed as the builder, Bill’s name was not mentioned.

In the 1970’s the car was rebuilt. The then new owner was looking for a complete new look for the car. He “sectioned” the car by removing material from the bottom, to give the car even more optical length. The Olds Grille was removed to make place for a large opening with unknown grille insert. The hood was louvered and at the back 1950 Mercury taillights were set on molded in pods. Not really a pretty sight. But we have to understand the scene at the time this car was rebuilt again was completely different than what we are used to now. We can only be happy that the car was at least cared for and not junked like so many others during this period.

 

CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-15-WThis is how the mercury was shown in the Custom Cars Trend book No. 101 in 1951. (it was actually shown smaller than we show here)
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-01-WNever before published photo of the Mercury in 1959. The car was painted teal green in the early 1950’s which it was still wearing in 1959. Although it looks like some repair work was going on, and possibly a repaint.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-05-W1980 photo shows the car with the sectioned body and the molded in pods for the 1950 Mercury taillights. The rear wheel openings were opened up on this version as well.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-13-WFrom the barry Mazza collection come the next three photos showing the new styling for the car in the 1970’s – 80’s. The car looked already very long with the chop and full fade-away fenders, but the sectioning made it look even longer.
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Phil Waters from the Uk was on a trip to the Lead Sled Spectacle Des Moines when he visited the NSRA Street Rod Nationals at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds in 1982. At this show he spotted this great looking 1941 Mercury full custom. At the time he had no idea what the car was, but it was interesting enough to shoot some photos of it.

CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1983-01Bill DeCarr’s 1941 Mercury at the 1982¬†NSRA Street Rod Nationals at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1983-02Apparently the then owner thought the car might sell better if he showed the engine.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1983-03By¬†1982¬†the hood on Bill’s old Custom had been punched with 6 rows of louvres.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-12-WBarry Mazza later took these photos at the same show. His photo gives us a good look at the 1950 Mercury taillights. The Exhaust pipes exit at the top of the taillight. Custom made bumpers from round rod and bumper ends welded to them.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-11-WThe then owner had later put the hood back on the car and taped some info on the A-Pillars.
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And now for the really happy part of the story. William Polk has owned the Bill DeCarr¬†1941 Mercury for many years. And a couple of years ago he decided to undo the last round of modifications and get the car back, close to how it was originally¬†built by Bill DeCarr¬†in the late 1940’s. William hand made all the bottom pieces that were removed from the cars lower edge decades ago, to get it back to stock specs. An 1948 Old grille was added again, just like all the other touches that had been removed and replaced over the years.

The last photos we show here in this CCC-Article are from 2012 when the car was nearly finished. We hope to be able to show you more photos of the finished car here soon.

 

CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-10-WHere we can see the new body panels that were added to un-section the body. The Oldsmobile grille has already been installed at this point.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-09-WThe rear wheel opening was closed up again, and the taillight pods were removed. A new splash pan was created and molded to the body.
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CCC-Bill_DeCarr-Mercury-1959-06-WThe car how is sat in 2012. Almost completed.
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More info/resources.

  • Custom Cars, Trend book No. 101, 1951
  • Barris Techniques of the 50’s, Volume 1, 1995
  • Custom Car Photo Archive, Bill DeCarr 1941 Mercury

 

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Watson painted Lime Gold Model A

 

LIME GOLD MODEL A

 

Good friends, Larry Watson and Bill DeCarr worked together on many projects. David C. Martin’s model A Roadster is one of those projects.



In 1959 Bill DeCarr takes over Ed Schelhaas his old body shop on 10118 Artesia Blvd. in Belflower. Some time after that Larry Watson will be joining Bill in this shop. Larry will operate his custom painting business from the paint booth in the back. In the past Bill and Larry have already collaborated on many project, and now working in the same building it was making things a lot easier. This article shares some of the photos from the Larry Watson Personal Collection of David C. Martin’s 1929 Model A Roadster. One of the few Hot Rods that were done in the DeCarr/Watson shop.


[box_light]This article shows a selection of photos from the Larry Watson Personal Photo Collection. More on Larry’s personal collection can be found in the Larry Watson section on the CCC-Site. Or on the Custom Car Photo Archive.[/box_light]

CCC-David-C-Martin-A-Watson-01-WBill deCarr can be seen here working on the bottom of the cowl where the extension was made. 


CCC-David-C-Martin-A-Watson-04-WA narrowed 1940 Ford Dash was fitted to the car. The dash was filled and had new round gauge pods grafted in. The steering wheel looks to be a 1960 Imperial Flying Crest boat steering wheel.


CCC-David-C-Martin-A-Watson-03-WParked in front of Bill’s shop, which is on the right and only one small portion and an in progress extension can be seen in this photo. Larry’s paint booth is the the gray building with the two large doors behind the red 1957 Ford.


CCC-David-C-Martin-A-Watson-02-WBill deCarr posing inside the roadster in front of the side doors of his shop.


CCC-David-C-Martin-A-Watson-06-WThe car has now been painted lime gold by Larry and was being put together. The Hot Rod had a Buick engine, chopped windshield and sectioned 32 Ford grille.¬†The doors of larry’s paint booth are open in this photo.


CCC-David-C-Martin-A-Watson-05-WSadly we do not know who the other people are who are posing with the Roadster.


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CCC-David-C-Martin-A-Watson-08-WNice high angle shows the custom steering wheel the Oldsmobile taillights and the chrome plated license plate surround.


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The Model A which was owned by David C. Martin back in the 1950’s is still around today, now owned by Robert A. Barmore. The photo of the car in yellow with green flames is from the late 1970’s. The red version is how the car looks now.


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