Advertisement

 
 


be inspired

November 6, 2013

Anne Frank in colour

AMSTERDAM 1935 – 1945 FROM BLACK AND WHITE INTO COLOUR

Almost everybody knows what Anne Frank looked like. A dark haired, bright eyed, young girl with a dazzling smile. She touched the furthest corners of the world with her intimate and brave diary entries, which document the atrocities of the Holocaust with unrelenting optimism. Despite her tragic death at only 15 years old, Anne’s wisdom, courage and endless love continue to move strangers to this day. As Anne herself said, “Who would ever think that so much went on in the soul of a young girl?”

But her words, and photos, have become so iconic, that we tend to forget Anne Frank was also just a little girl. Living in Amsterdam with her sister Margot, and her parents, playing with her friends and their dolls.  And to them the world was not iconic, nor black and white. It was a time where nothing was certain anymore. An extremely dangerous time when you where Jewish, gay or a Gypsy.

The Netherlands Institute for War Documentation, and the Anne Frank House, asked Dutch visual designer Michael Danckaarts, to combine details of Anne’s life with knowledge about contemporary Amsterdam. Resulting in these amazing and riveting photographs and a wonderful app called “Anne’s Amsterdam”.

Danckaarts combined black-and-white photographs from Anne’s lifetime with a contemporary image of the city streets. Thus transporting viewers to the Nazi-occupied Netherlands where Anne once lived in hiding, causing an almost physical shock. I’ve been living in Amsterdam for over 25 years, and to me those images are a sharp reminder that the war and the holocaust might be in the past, but is very much interconnected with our time and with whom we are.
Let us know what you think. The app and website are translated into German and English. But some of the video’s are in Dutch. If you need any translation, please let us know.

CCC-NIOD-Waterlooplein_03“The Jewish quarter” first signs appear in Amsterdam 1941, at the corner of the City hall and the Mozes and Aaron church

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

 

CCC-NIOD-Berlagebrug_04German Soldiers drive into Amsterdam on the Berlage bridge on May 15, 1940 

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

 

CCC-NIOD-AvA_Blauwbrug_02The German police closes of the Jewish neighbourhood at the Blauwe Brug (blue bridge) February 12, 1941. The ’39 Mercury is probably confiscated.

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

CCC-NIOD-Merwedeplein_02Anne Frank and her friends in 1936. The Franks lived in south of Amsterdam in a neighborhood were many other Jewish refugees have sought refuge. The building behind them is the first “skyscraper’ in Amsterdam, built by architect Staal.

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

 

CCC-NIOD-Museumplein_02The leader of the SS, Heinrich Himmler, speaks to the newly formed Amsterdam Police Battalion on the Museumplein. 18 May 1942

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

 

CCC-NIOD-MeijerpleinV2lanE5On 22 and 23 February 1941, the Nazis hold one of the first major raids in the Netherlands The arrests are a reprisal for fighting between Jews and Dutch and German antisemitic. A total of 427 Jewish men are rounded up in the streets round the Waterlooplein and the Jonas Daniël Meijerplein. They are then deported to concentration camps Buchenwald and Mauthausen via prison camp Schoorl. Only one of them survived the war. Note the (probably confiscated) ’39 Mercury in the middle. 

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

CCC-NIOD-Victorieplein_03During the last raid almost all Jews in the South of Amsterdam are being arrested, June 20, 1943
Jews walking to the grassy area in front of the ‘skyscraper’ on the Daniël Willinkplein. They must assemble here and wait until they are taken away by the Germans. After the war the name of this square is changed to Victorieplein. It’s not far from where Anne used to live on the Merwedeplein before she went in to hiding.
During the raid on Sunday 20 June 1943 about 5500 Jews from Amsterdam-Zuid and Oost are picked up. Many have been compelled to move to Amsterdam from other parts of the Netherlands in the previous year.

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

CCC-NIOD-Singel400cut_03Singel 400, Amsterdam 1935. Anne Frank is standing on the steps of the house where Otto Frank is setting up a new business ‘Opekta’ In 1933 the Frank family fled from Germany to Amsterdam. 

Photo Montage: Michel Dankaarts, LBi Lost Boys
© Anne Frank House© NIOD / Anne Frank House

 5,880 total views,  8 views today

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
0



About the Author

Esther de Charon de Saint Germain
Esther is our design, art, fashion and other none-car-related-topics contributor. She is an art historian with a degree in Asian Contemporary Art , a communication professional with extensive experience in design, contemporary art, communications and events and a personal coach. She is infected with the custom car and hot rod virus (an unavoidable result of being married to Rik Hoving) but (due to being a coach and all) especially likes the stories about the people who built them.




3 Comments


  1. Thank you for sharing these. Really brings “life” to the images of the past and helps us feel the reality of it just that much more. The picture of Anne on the front steps of her dad’s new shop hits me most I think as I have similar pictures of my mother front the same time and age.

    0

  2. Those are absolutely amazing photos. I always like looking at “then and now” photos, where you see two views of the same location, (from the same angle) at two different points in history. But this is a totally new twist on that theme! Really, really, well done! Nice work, and a very important time for all of us to remember.

    0

  3. Thank You for the great pictures , and story of a special young lady.

    0


You must be logged in to post a comment.


Advertisement